Legal & Technical Issues of Autonomous Vehicles

All Streams are across 2 days

Conference Schedule


Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

Keynote Presentations
Offenbachsaal

Moderator
David Schoenmaekers, attache at Federal Public Service Mobility and Transport (Belgian transport authority), DG Road Transport and Road Safety Policy Unit, BELGIUM

10:10 - Digitisation and automation as the main components for creating the next-generation road transportation – possibilities and challenges
Hamid Zarghampour, chief strategist, Trafikverket, Swedish Transport Administration, SWEDEN
Highly automated and connected vehicles have the potential to profoundly change road transportation. The intense technical development and the introduction of innovative transport solutions enables creation of the next generation of passengers and freight transport. How real is this really? What are the long-term possibilities, and what are the most important challenges in the short run to create safe and clean road transportation? This speech covers the issues of concern in the near and long term, as well as the key success factors for realising highly automated road transportation systems in the decade ahead.

10:35 - The challenge of approving automated vehicles for road operation
Oliver Carsten, professor of transport safety, Institute for Transport Studies University of Leeds-Expert for European Transport Safety Council, UK
Creating a process for testing and approval of automated vehicles for safe operation on the road presents a considerable challenge. We may wish to look to aviation for precedent, but there are considerable differences between commercial flight and road operations. Automated vehicles will have to interact appropriately with human drivers, motorcycle riders and, in many environments, with pedestrians, cyclists and even horse riders. In addition, for levels of automation below full automation, the vehicle has to be able to interact with the human operator, who is supposed to be able to resume control if needed. Thus, central to the challenge of safe operation is good and intuitive HMI design, both within the vehicle and to the outside. All of this will pose significant difficulties for the testing and approval authorities, who will need to ensure that safe operation can be verified. This cannot be done just by regulation of the vehicles’ sensor capability and of the engineering design of the assistance systems. A case can be made that human-in-the-loop testing will be needed to confirm the usability of the automated modes.

11:00 - AUTOCITS project: regulation study for the adoption of autonomous driving
Dr Jose Naranjo, professor, University Institute for Automobile Research, SPAIN
Mauro Gil Cabeza, Researcher and Dissemination leader of Autocits, INDRA SISTEMAS, SPAIN
This paper describes the first experiences of the AUTOCITS European Project, regulation study of the adoption of autonomous driving in the European urban nodes. AUTOCITS is a CEF TEN-T European Project approved in Call 2015, which aims to contribute to the deployment of autonomous vehicles on European roads by analyzing and improving the current regulations that affect the effective deployment of autonomous vehicles, and demonstrating and assessing the feasibility of these regulations with several pilots. The work of the project will be developed in the TEN-T Atlantic Corridor, involving partners in France, Spain and Portugal.

11:25 - 12:30 - Panel Discussion - Determining Liability - Issues for Courts, Regulators and Law Enforcement. PLUS – What are the Legal Implications for OEMs, Suppliers, and Consumers?

Alexander M Geisler, partner, Duane Morris, UK
Daniel Fesler, lawyer-partner, Baker & McKenzie, BELGIUM
Gerhard Deiters, lawyer/partner, BHO Legal, GERMANY
Martijn Steger, chief innovation officer and leader, global business law, Kegler Brown Hill + Ritter, USA
Matt Burton, legal director II, regulatory development, Uber, USA


Moderator:
Alex Glassbrook, barrister and author of “The Law of Driverless Cars: An Introduction”, Temple Garden Chambers

12:30 - 14:00 - Lunch

The Requirement for European Guidelines on Autonomous Driving
Offenbachsaal

Moderator
Oliver Carsten, professor of transport safety, Institute for Transport Studies University of Leeds-Expert for European Transport Safety Council, UK

14:00 - Bottlenecks resulting from current regulation, and explore a number of options to overcome these
Roeland de Bruin LLM, lecturer, Utrecht University School of Law - Molengraff for Private Law, NETHERLANDS
Defining autonomous intelligent vehicles - Product liability law - Non-harmonized rules on liability for motor vehicles - Tracing technology and its impact on data privacy of drivers, passengers and bystanders - GDPR compliance for developers of autonomous intelligent vehicles

14:25 - Belgian procedure for testing of automated vehicles and how the code of practice contributes to safe testing
David Schoenmaekers, attache at Federal Public Service Mobility and Transport (Belgian transport authority), DG Road Transport and Road Safety Policy Unit, BELGIUM
To support the technological evolution towards automated vehicles, several countries are developing procedures to grant permission for tests. From the government’s perspective, the testing of new automated vehicle technologies on public roads or in other public places should be facilitated, but care must be taken that these tests are designed and conducted to minimise potential risk. In Belgium, a code of practice was endorsed in September 2016, inspired by the UK Government’s code. Approvals for testing projects have to fulfil the guidelines and recommendations for measures to maintain safety during this testing phase. At the same time, the document highlights some issues that will have to be regulated in view of the market introduction of these new technologies.

14:50 -

15:15 - 15:35 - Break

15:35 - Vehicle type approval: interrelationship of national, European and international law
Simone Ruth Schumacher LLM, research assistant automated driving, Research Institute of Public and Private Security, Institute for Safety and Security Research (FÖPS Berlin), GERMANY
Constructive requirements for vehicle type approval today are dominated by European law and increasingly influenced by international law, whereas national law plays a rather inferior role. The presentation aims at carving out what this three-level regulatory framework promotes and what hinders automated and autonomous driving.

16:00 - Regulatory landscape in Europe and liability risks
Dr Benedikt Wolfers, partner, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, GERMANY
Background: Which regulation is relevant for autonomous vehicles in Europe? Approval: Can autonomous vehicles be type approved in Europe? § Current Status: Can autonomous vehicles be run in Europe? § Risks: Can regulatory compliance exclude liability risks for the manufacturer?

16:25 - Latest legal aspects of testing autonomous vehicles in France
Andrea Martinesco, Attorney, Federal Prosecution Office, VEDECOM/UVSQ - Member of the LMT (UFLA), FRANCE
The presentation will focus on the legal aspects of the latest testing of autonomous vehicles in France. This includes new technology demonstration as we saw with Vedecom’s demonstration at the ITS World Congress in Bordeaux in 2015, as well as on open roads in Paris and Versailles. An overview of current regulations in Europe and the United States will also be covered.

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

Legal Challenges and Determining Liability
Offenbachsaal

Moderator
Alexander M Geisler, partner, Duane Morris, UK

09:00 - From driver assistance systems to autonomous driving: contractual risk allocation in the supply chain and the consequences for liability and recourse along the supply chain
Dr Christian Kessel, partner - head of the International Automotive Group, Bird & Bird LLP, GERMANY
The new disruptive technology players in the driver assistance and autonomous driving market need to be integrated into the traditional automotive supply chain considering their legal background and culture in their own industries as well as the typical risks associated with software solutions, electronics, connectivity, telecommunication services, cloud and big data offerings. The resulting challenges for appropriate contractual risk allocations are considerable. This presentation will discuss key issues that already appear in practice regarding risk allocation and their repercussions on liability, as well as the effects on taking recourse in case of serial defects, field action or recalls.

09:25 - Liability, insurance and other regulatory issues for autonomous vehicles
Stuart Young, partner, Gowling WLG, UK
David Williams, technical director, AXA Insurance, UK
David Williams of AXA and Stuart Young of Gowling WLG will consider and comment on the liability and related insurance issues arising from the commercialisation of autonomous vehicles. They will look at the role of insurance in providing market certainty, how the future for insurance might evolve, data and privacy issues in liability/insurance and more widely in commercialising AVs, as well as a brief look at how regulation needs to help the market to emerge in the right way.

09:50 - Data – one of the key factors for regulatory and liability challenges for connected and autonomous vehicles
Dr Stephan Appt LLM, partner, Head of Automotive Group, Pinsent Masons Germany LLP, GERMANY
Established stakeholders within automotive industry and those new to the market are all chasing connected car data, the “new oil”. Will the regulatory framework set limits for and control their appetite and who will permitted to sit at the table? EU laws will shape the framework for using personal data (GDPR) and the Commission is looking at rules for a “European Data Economy” covering the topic of data ownership and access, portability, interoperability and liability. Are the established product liability rules fit for the future with “over the air”, v2x sensor data exchanges making it difficult to establish the exact source of a problem that leads to damages and who is to be held liable? Is it necessary to use Big Data to avoid liability? Will camera data cause issues?

10:15 - 10:45 - Break

10:45 - Automated and Autonomous Vehicles – thoughts about reforming the liability regime
Mathias N Schubert, senior underwriter liability, Treaty Europe, Gen Re | Global Treaty, GERMANY
The advent of automated and autonomous vehicles raises questions in the area of liability and insurance. The presentation addresses issues in Motor Third Party Liability and Product Liability (including liability insurance) and reflects on a recent initiative by the European Parliament proposing, inter alia, new liability rules in the area of robotics. The presentation closes with some provocative ideas for novel solutions that may make sense in the long run, in response to the new and emerging technology.

11:10 - Reviewing the product liability issues raised by Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and Connected and Autonomous Vehicle (CAV) technologies
Lucy McCormick, barrister, Henderson Chambers, UK
Lucy will cover the key legal and practical considerations, including: · Consumer expectation, · ‘Failure to warn’; · Contributory negligence · Misuse of the vehicle · The so-called ‘state of the art’ defence.

11:35 - From theory to real life: how vehicle autonomy is affecting and will affect accidentology and insurance
François Nédey, chief underwriting officer, Allianz France, FRANCE
Frank Sommerfeld, member of the board of management, Allianz Versicherungs-AG, GERMANY
The presentation will discuss: the impact of ADAS on regulation – what needs to be changed, when and in which direction; the impact on frequencies and severity – what do we know (based on actual data/observations), what do we expect; the impact on the insurance market and distribution; changes to driver behaviour – the good and the bad.

12:00 - Robotic responsibility for machine learning: privacy perspectives in autonomous decisions
Katherine Sheriff, Juris Doctor to Attorney, Warshauer Law Group PC; Emory University School of Law, USA
Traditional tort liability relies on concepts emerging from interactions between vehicles and humans. In many ways, tort law reflects the inherent knowledge humans carry in their daily activities and the limitations of epistemological means of acquiring knowledge, while valuing privacy. Although these concepts are flexible and readily ascribable to humans in a wide variety of circumstances, it is unclear how, and if, these concepts should be applicable to artificial intelligence. This paper proposes to extend tort law and knowledge via quantitative dynamic software testing to determine liability for decisions made by artificial intelligence utilized by programming in autonomous vehicles.

12:25 - 13:25 - Lunch

The Safe and Successful Integration of AV Technology
Offenbachsaal

Moderator
Françoise Gilbert, partner, Greenberg Traurig, USA

13:25 - Practicalities of testing automated vehicles in public city environments
Prof Nick Reed, director, academy, TRL, UK
This presentation will describe the GATEway project – a collaborative project funded by UK government and industry and led by TRL in which we are testing several different types of automated vehicle in real world public environments on the streets of Greenwich, London. I will describe the testing regime for the vehicles ahead of trials and the regulatory and ethical clearances that achieved in order to undertake our trials protocols. This includes consideration of vehicle technologies, adaptations to infrastructure and liaison with emergency services to develop a robust safety case in which risk is managed effectively to enable the safe evaluation of the technologies under test.

13:50 - Riding the Green Wave – how Connected Cars can help to smooth traffic flow and improve drivers’ safety
Christian Ress, Supervisor Automated Driving Europe, Ford Research & Advanced Engineering, GERMANY
UK Autodrive is the largest of the current UK government-supported trials into connected and autonomous vehicles. Taking place across the two host cities of Milton Keynes and Coventry, the three-year project is using multiple car manufacturers (Ford, Jaguar Land Rover, Tata Motors) to trial the compatibility and interoperability of the technology – as well as examining public attitudes, potential future business models, possible effects on congestion and issues relating to insurance, safety and legislation. In this presentation, Christian Ress will focus on the innovative V2X Connected Car features being developed by UK Autodrive, from connected traffic lights that help motorists minimise red light stops to emergency brake and intersection collision warnings that could could potentially improve driver safety.

14:15 - Living-lab for safe integration of autonomous vehicles and other road-users
Daniela Patz, innovation project manager at Smart Safety Solutions, Austrian Road Safety Board, AUSTRIA
Vienna metropolitan region hosts an independent real-world living lab on sustainable automated driving. Global state-of-the-art is tested in a real-world mixed-traffic test bed from the airport to the city centre conference arena. Main focus: dynamic interaction between pedestrians, two-wheelers and autonomous cars in an urban environment. The test bed includes traffic lights, multimodal integration as well as significant elements of the European C-ITS corridor. Momentum is added by highly visible events accompanying Austrian presidency in EU-Council 2018 and TRA 2018. All this is being set up as truly independent mobility lab open to all. Further details soon: www.wien-zwa.at

14:40 - Future Abuses and Counter Measures
Alex Glassbrook, barrister and author of “The Law of Driverless Cars: An Introduction”, Temple Garden Chambers, UK
As technology innovates and expands, so do the opportunities for abuse. Alex Glassbrook considers the future vulnerabilities of driverless technologies to abusive and criminal behaviour. He reflects upon the lessons of defending fraudulent motor accident claims in the UK, and describes how the legal system responded to such claims. He examines how driverless technology might introduce new abuses, and how the law might respond effectively.

15:05 - Are you (still) in the driver's seat? A global view on autonomous driving and connected vehicles
Dr Patrick Ayad, partner - head of automotive, Hogan Lovells International LLP, GERMANY
Autonomous driving and connected vehicles are transforming the automotive industry sector like no other innovation in decades. The latest industry trends present a wide range of challenges for traditional automotive companies, but they also offer many opportunities for those that manage to enhance their business model from automotive manufacturer to solution and service provider. Reducing exposure to risk and managing the various commercial and legal challenges requires organisations to anticipate and be prepared to navigate through the emerging legal risks. This presentation explores two of the major trends affecting the automotive market. The impact of these developments on various areas will be identified and then mapped to the businesses changes that will result. The areas examined will include the opportunities driverless cars will generate, the regulatory background, how technology will shift ownership of vehicles, the impact on liability, the result of constant connectivity and the marketing options presented.

15:30 - Dealing with privacy and data ownership
Dr Christoph Werkmeister LLM, associate, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, GERMANY
What data is collected / processed by autonomous vehicles? Data protection – what are the risks and who is responsible? § Privacy by design as a new approach to compliance? § Who has access to the data and who owns it?

15:55 - 16:55 - “HANDS OFF MY CAR - PRIVACY, CYBERSECURITY AND OTHER LEGAL CHALLENGES OF CONNECTED CARS”
The development of connected cars, autonomous cars that are always connected to ensure higher reliability, has come to a critical point. The new technology entails significant legal challenges that need to be fully understood and addressed. This presentation aims at giving an overview of existing laws and regulations in Europe and in the US, as well as to point at the most significant privacy, cybersecurity and other legal problems deriving from this technology.”
Françoise Gilbert, partner, Greenberg Traurig, USA
Raffaele Zallone, counsel, Studio Legale Zallone, ITALY

Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

Keynote Presentations
Offenbachsaal

Moderator
David Schoenmaekers, attache at Federal Public Service Mobility and Transport (Belgian transport authority), DG Road Transport and Road Safety Policy Unit, BELGIUM

10:10 - Digitisation and automation as the main components for creating the next-generation road transportation – possibilities and challenges
Hamid Zarghampour, chief strategist, Trafikverket, Swedish Transport Administration, SWEDEN
Highly automated and connected vehicles have the potential to profoundly change road transportation. The intense technical development and the introduction of innovative transport solutions enables creation of the next generation of passengers and freight transport. How real is this really? What are the long-term possibilities, and what are the most important challenges in the short run to create safe and clean road transportation? This speech covers the issues of concern in the near and long term, as well as the key success factors for realising highly automated road transportation systems in the decade ahead.

10:35 - The challenge of approving automated vehicles for road operation
Oliver Carsten, professor of transport safety, Institute for Transport Studies University of Leeds-Expert for European Transport Safety Council, UK
Creating a process for testing and approval of automated vehicles for safe operation on the road presents a considerable challenge. We may wish to look to aviation for precedent, but there are considerable differences between commercial flight and road operations. Automated vehicles will have to interact appropriately with human drivers, motorcycle riders and, in many environments, with pedestrians, cyclists and even horse riders. In addition, for levels of automation below full automation, the vehicle has to be able to interact with the human operator, who is supposed to be able to resume control if needed. Thus, central to the challenge of safe operation is good and intuitive HMI design, both within the vehicle and to the outside. All of this will pose significant difficulties for the testing and approval authorities, who will need to ensure that safe operation can be verified. This cannot be done just by regulation of the vehicles’ sensor capability and of the engineering design of the assistance systems. A case can be made that human-in-the-loop testing will be needed to confirm the usability of the automated modes.

11:00 - AUTOCITS project: regulation study for the adoption of autonomous driving
Dr Jose Naranjo, professor, University Institute for Automobile Research, SPAIN
Mauro Gil Cabeza, Researcher and Dissemination leader of Autocits, INDRA SISTEMAS, SPAIN
This paper describes the first experiences of the AUTOCITS European Project, regulation study of the adoption of autonomous driving in the European urban nodes. AUTOCITS is a CEF TEN-T European Project approved in Call 2015, which aims to contribute to the deployment of autonomous vehicles on European roads by analyzing and improving the current regulations that affect the effective deployment of autonomous vehicles, and demonstrating and assessing the feasibility of these regulations with several pilots. The work of the project will be developed in the TEN-T Atlantic Corridor, involving partners in France, Spain and Portugal.

11:25 - 12:30 - Panel Discussion - Determining Liability - Issues for Courts, Regulators and Law Enforcement. PLUS – What are the Legal Implications for OEMs, Suppliers, and Consumers?

Alexander M Geisler, partner, Duane Morris, UK
Daniel Fesler, lawyer-partner, Baker & McKenzie, BELGIUM
Gerhard Deiters, lawyer/partner, BHO Legal, GERMANY
Martijn Steger, chief innovation officer and leader, global business law, Kegler Brown Hill + Ritter, USA
Matt Burton, legal director II, regulatory development, Uber, USA


Moderator:
Alex Glassbrook, barrister and author of “The Law of Driverless Cars: An Introduction”, Temple Garden Chambers

12:30 - 14:00 - Lunch

The Requirement for European Guidelines on Autonomous Driving
Offenbachsaal

Moderator
Oliver Carsten, professor of transport safety, Institute for Transport Studies University of Leeds-Expert for European Transport Safety Council, UK

14:00 - Bottlenecks resulting from current regulation, and explore a number of options to overcome these
Roeland de Bruin LLM, lecturer, Utrecht University School of Law - Molengraff for Private Law, NETHERLANDS
Defining autonomous intelligent vehicles - Product liability law - Non-harmonized rules on liability for motor vehicles - Tracing technology and its impact on data privacy of drivers, passengers and bystanders - GDPR compliance for developers of autonomous intelligent vehicles

14:25 - Belgian procedure for testing of automated vehicles and how the code of practice contributes to safe testing
David Schoenmaekers, attache at Federal Public Service Mobility and Transport (Belgian transport authority), DG Road Transport and Road Safety Policy Unit, BELGIUM
To support the technological evolution towards automated vehicles, several countries are developing procedures to grant permission for tests. From the government’s perspective, the testing of new automated vehicle technologies on public roads or in other public places should be facilitated, but care must be taken that these tests are designed and conducted to minimise potential risk. In Belgium, a code of practice was endorsed in September 2016, inspired by the UK Government’s code. Approvals for testing projects have to fulfil the guidelines and recommendations for measures to maintain safety during this testing phase. At the same time, the document highlights some issues that will have to be regulated in view of the market introduction of these new technologies.

14:50 -

15:15 - 15:35 - Break

15:35 - Vehicle type approval: interrelationship of national, European and international law
Simone Ruth Schumacher LLM, research assistant automated driving, Research Institute of Public and Private Security, Institute for Safety and Security Research (FÖPS Berlin), GERMANY
Constructive requirements for vehicle type approval today are dominated by European law and increasingly influenced by international law, whereas national law plays a rather inferior role. The presentation aims at carving out what this three-level regulatory framework promotes and what hinders automated and autonomous driving.

16:00 - Regulatory landscape in Europe and liability risks
Dr Benedikt Wolfers, partner, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, GERMANY
Background: Which regulation is relevant for autonomous vehicles in Europe? Approval: Can autonomous vehicles be type approved in Europe? § Current Status: Can autonomous vehicles be run in Europe? § Risks: Can regulatory compliance exclude liability risks for the manufacturer?

16:25 - Latest legal aspects of testing autonomous vehicles in France
Andrea Martinesco, Attorney, Federal Prosecution Office, VEDECOM/UVSQ - Member of the LMT (UFLA), FRANCE
The presentation will focus on the legal aspects of the latest testing of autonomous vehicles in France. This includes new technology demonstration as we saw with Vedecom’s demonstration at the ITS World Congress in Bordeaux in 2015, as well as on open roads in Paris and Versailles. An overview of current regulations in Europe and the United States will also be covered.

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

Legal Challenges and Determining Liability
Offenbachsaal

Moderator
Alexander M Geisler, partner, Duane Morris, UK

09:00 - From driver assistance systems to autonomous driving: contractual risk allocation in the supply chain and the consequences for liability and recourse along the supply chain
Dr Christian Kessel, partner - head of the International Automotive Group, Bird & Bird LLP, GERMANY
The new disruptive technology players in the driver assistance and autonomous driving market need to be integrated into the traditional automotive supply chain considering their legal background and culture in their own industries as well as the typical risks associated with software solutions, electronics, connectivity, telecommunication services, cloud and big data offerings. The resulting challenges for appropriate contractual risk allocations are considerable. This presentation will discuss key issues that already appear in practice regarding risk allocation and their repercussions on liability, as well as the effects on taking recourse in case of serial defects, field action or recalls.

09:25 - Liability, insurance and other regulatory issues for autonomous vehicles
Stuart Young, partner, Gowling WLG, UK
David Williams, technical director, AXA Insurance, UK
David Williams of AXA and Stuart Young of Gowling WLG will consider and comment on the liability and related insurance issues arising from the commercialisation of autonomous vehicles. They will look at the role of insurance in providing market certainty, how the future for insurance might evolve, data and privacy issues in liability/insurance and more widely in commercialising AVs, as well as a brief look at how regulation needs to help the market to emerge in the right way.

09:50 - Data – one of the key factors for regulatory and liability challenges for connected and autonomous vehicles
Dr Stephan Appt LLM, partner, Head of Automotive Group, Pinsent Masons Germany LLP, GERMANY
Established stakeholders within automotive industry and those new to the market are all chasing connected car data, the “new oil”. Will the regulatory framework set limits for and control their appetite and who will permitted to sit at the table? EU laws will shape the framework for using personal data (GDPR) and the Commission is looking at rules for a “European Data Economy” covering the topic of data ownership and access, portability, interoperability and liability. Are the established product liability rules fit for the future with “over the air”, v2x sensor data exchanges making it difficult to establish the exact source of a problem that leads to damages and who is to be held liable? Is it necessary to use Big Data to avoid liability? Will camera data cause issues?

10:15 - 10:45 - Break

10:45 - Automated and Autonomous Vehicles – thoughts about reforming the liability regime
Mathias N Schubert, senior underwriter liability, Treaty Europe, Gen Re | Global Treaty, GERMANY
The advent of automated and autonomous vehicles raises questions in the area of liability and insurance. The presentation addresses issues in Motor Third Party Liability and Product Liability (including liability insurance) and reflects on a recent initiative by the European Parliament proposing, inter alia, new liability rules in the area of robotics. The presentation closes with some provocative ideas for novel solutions that may make sense in the long run, in response to the new and emerging technology.

11:10 - Reviewing the product liability issues raised by Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and Connected and Autonomous Vehicle (CAV) technologies
Lucy McCormick, barrister, Henderson Chambers, UK
Lucy will cover the key legal and practical considerations, including: · Consumer expectation, · ‘Failure to warn’; · Contributory negligence · Misuse of the vehicle · The so-called ‘state of the art’ defence.

11:35 - From theory to real life: how vehicle autonomy is affecting and will affect accidentology and insurance
François Nédey, chief underwriting officer, Allianz France, FRANCE
Frank Sommerfeld, member of the board of management, Allianz Versicherungs-AG, GERMANY
The presentation will discuss: the impact of ADAS on regulation – what needs to be changed, when and in which direction; the impact on frequencies and severity – what do we know (based on actual data/observations), what do we expect; the impact on the insurance market and distribution; changes to driver behaviour – the good and the bad.

12:00 - Robotic responsibility for machine learning: privacy perspectives in autonomous decisions
Katherine Sheriff, Juris Doctor to Attorney, Warshauer Law Group PC; Emory University School of Law, USA
Traditional tort liability relies on concepts emerging from interactions between vehicles and humans. In many ways, tort law reflects the inherent knowledge humans carry in their daily activities and the limitations of epistemological means of acquiring knowledge, while valuing privacy. Although these concepts are flexible and readily ascribable to humans in a wide variety of circumstances, it is unclear how, and if, these concepts should be applicable to artificial intelligence. This paper proposes to extend tort law and knowledge via quantitative dynamic software testing to determine liability for decisions made by artificial intelligence utilized by programming in autonomous vehicles.

12:25 - 13:25 - Lunch

The Safe and Successful Integration of AV Technology
Offenbachsaal

Moderator
Françoise Gilbert, partner, Greenberg Traurig, USA

13:25 - Practicalities of testing automated vehicles in public city environments
Prof Nick Reed, director, academy, TRL, UK
This presentation will describe the GATEway project – a collaborative project funded by UK government and industry and led by TRL in which we are testing several different types of automated vehicle in real world public environments on the streets of Greenwich, London. I will describe the testing regime for the vehicles ahead of trials and the regulatory and ethical clearances that achieved in order to undertake our trials protocols. This includes consideration of vehicle technologies, adaptations to infrastructure and liaison with emergency services to develop a robust safety case in which risk is managed effectively to enable the safe evaluation of the technologies under test.

13:50 - Riding the Green Wave – how Connected Cars can help to smooth traffic flow and improve drivers’ safety
Christian Ress, Supervisor Automated Driving Europe, Ford Research & Advanced Engineering, GERMANY
UK Autodrive is the largest of the current UK government-supported trials into connected and autonomous vehicles. Taking place across the two host cities of Milton Keynes and Coventry, the three-year project is using multiple car manufacturers (Ford, Jaguar Land Rover, Tata Motors) to trial the compatibility and interoperability of the technology – as well as examining public attitudes, potential future business models, possible effects on congestion and issues relating to insurance, safety and legislation. In this presentation, Christian Ress will focus on the innovative V2X Connected Car features being developed by UK Autodrive, from connected traffic lights that help motorists minimise red light stops to emergency brake and intersection collision warnings that could could potentially improve driver safety.

14:15 - Living-lab for safe integration of autonomous vehicles and other road-users
Daniela Patz, innovation project manager at Smart Safety Solutions, Austrian Road Safety Board, AUSTRIA
Vienna metropolitan region hosts an independent real-world living lab on sustainable automated driving. Global state-of-the-art is tested in a real-world mixed-traffic test bed from the airport to the city centre conference arena. Main focus: dynamic interaction between pedestrians, two-wheelers and autonomous cars in an urban environment. The test bed includes traffic lights, multimodal integration as well as significant elements of the European C-ITS corridor. Momentum is added by highly visible events accompanying Austrian presidency in EU-Council 2018 and TRA 2018. All this is being set up as truly independent mobility lab open to all. Further details soon: www.wien-zwa.at

14:40 - Future Abuses and Counter Measures
Alex Glassbrook, barrister and author of “The Law of Driverless Cars: An Introduction”, Temple Garden Chambers, UK
As technology innovates and expands, so do the opportunities for abuse. Alex Glassbrook considers the future vulnerabilities of driverless technologies to abusive and criminal behaviour. He reflects upon the lessons of defending fraudulent motor accident claims in the UK, and describes how the legal system responded to such claims. He examines how driverless technology might introduce new abuses, and how the law might respond effectively.

15:05 - Are you (still) in the driver's seat? A global view on autonomous driving and connected vehicles
Dr Patrick Ayad, partner - head of automotive, Hogan Lovells International LLP, GERMANY
Autonomous driving and connected vehicles are transforming the automotive industry sector like no other innovation in decades. The latest industry trends present a wide range of challenges for traditional automotive companies, but they also offer many opportunities for those that manage to enhance their business model from automotive manufacturer to solution and service provider. Reducing exposure to risk and managing the various commercial and legal challenges requires organisations to anticipate and be prepared to navigate through the emerging legal risks. This presentation explores two of the major trends affecting the automotive market. The impact of these developments on various areas will be identified and then mapped to the businesses changes that will result. The areas examined will include the opportunities driverless cars will generate, the regulatory background, how technology will shift ownership of vehicles, the impact on liability, the result of constant connectivity and the marketing options presented.

15:30 - Dealing with privacy and data ownership
Dr Christoph Werkmeister LLM, associate, Freshfields Bruckhaus Deringer, GERMANY
What data is collected / processed by autonomous vehicles? Data protection – what are the risks and who is responsible? § Privacy by design as a new approach to compliance? § Who has access to the data and who owns it?

15:55 - 16:55 - “HANDS OFF MY CAR - PRIVACY, CYBERSECURITY AND OTHER LEGAL CHALLENGES OF CONNECTED CARS”
The development of connected cars, autonomous cars that are always connected to ensure higher reliability, has come to a critical point. The new technology entails significant legal challenges that need to be fully understood and addressed. This presentation aims at giving an overview of existing laws and regulations in Europe and in the US, as well as to point at the most significant privacy, cybersecurity and other legal problems deriving from this technology.”
Françoise Gilbert, partner, Greenberg Traurig, USA
Raffaele Zallone, counsel, Studio Legale Zallone, ITALY


Developing a Realistic Legal Framework for Safe & Successful Autonomous Vehicle Implementation

As the technology continues to develop at a rapid pace, Europe is in danger of falling behind the USA in making autonomous vehicles a reality, because a number of EU and UN laws and regulations will not allow autonomous or driverless vehicles. Although some European countries are already carrying out driverless vehicle testing in certain cities, there are still a number of regulatory and legal challenges that will need to be overcome before pan-European autonomous driving can take place.

The Future of Transportation World Conference will bring together European law makers, the automotive industry, technology suppliers, legal professionals and the insurance industry to discuss what changes are necessary in current regulations, and how to build a pan-European set of rules and laws governing autonomous and driverless cars to ensure their safe adoption and integration with the general public.

Key topic areas for discussion will include:

  • Adapting current safety standards and regulations to allow further testing of autonomous vehicles on public roads
  • Assessing liability in accidents involving autonomous vehicles
  • Establishing an international agreement on rules and regulations for autonomous vehicles
  • Safely integrating autonomous vehicles with other road users
  • Code of ethics for autonomous vehicles in the event of an unavoidable accident
  • Authorising police and law enforcement agencies to intercept and remotely stop self-driving vehicles
  • Allocating civil and criminal liability in the event of a cyberattack, vehicle hacking or deliberate interference with an automated vehicle
  • Changes to existing insurance laws
  • Privacy and data protection
  • Interoperability