Infrastructure and project funding

All Streams are across 2 days

Conference Schedule


Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

INFRASTRUCTURE AND PROJECT FUNDING
Meeting Room North

Moderator
Christian Bocci, senior partner, Weston Williamson + Partners, UK

10:10 - Smart mobility pilots near Amsterdam
Jeannet van Arum, director smart mobility, Provincie Noord-Holland, NETHERLANDS
In the Metropolitan Region of Amsterdam, the Province of Noord-Holland is doing pilots on smart mobility for the future. The focus of these projects is in communication with traffic lights, learning from the introduction of autonomous cars. We collaborate with, for instance, Nissan, the future bus of Daimler-Benz, University of Delft, and several service providers like KPN, Vialis, Swarco and Technolution. The pilots are done under public-private partnerships where all parties contribute in kind and in budget.

10:40 - Impact of the physical internet on sustainable logistics and transportation
Steffen Kaup, head of future innovation transport and logistics, Daimler AG, GERMANY
By 2050, the volume of goods that are transported will have increased by around 55%. That just wouldn’t be possible with the traffic infrastructure as we know it today. An innovative approach is to face the growing transport demand with a synchromodal transport system. Synchromodal is a synthesis of ‘synchro’, meaning occurring at the same time, and ‘intermodal’, referring to multiple means of transport. The model for this system is the internet and its forerunners. A similar solution might also be conceivable for the transport of physical goods, also called the Physical Internet.

11:10 - Future of transport and mobility technology in Dubai - potentials and obstacles to progress
Zeina Nazer, secretary general & director, ITS Arab & Innova Consulting, UK
It is imperative to improve and develop a secure and sustainable transportation system to serve the increasingly high concentration of people living in urban areas and the demand for higher levels of service and information regarding transport services (such as real time updates on bus and train schedules), transportation needs now have much more complex solutions than simply building new roads or rail lines. Innovative technology-driven approaches are required to meet these demands. Emerging Technologies are playing a central role in Dubai. The integration of technology with transport systems became a given — particularly with the move towards the development of Dubai Smart City. We will focus on the autonomous vehicles shuttles which are currently operating and the Personal Air Transport Systems (PATS) which are due to start flying this year. Touching on funding for such radical technologies and the wider socioeconomic impact, plus the accompanying infrastructure challenges. While those emerging technologies present opportunities to improve users convenience, they also presents a major challenge to ensuring those changes do not introduce a significantly higher level of security and privacy related risks for their users. Also, questions arise such as where will the funding for such radical technologies come from and what are the social and economic impacts. Last but not least, we will cover the accompanying infrastructure challenges. The challenges listed above will undoubtedly require a co-operative effort between governments, transport bodies, and supply chain partners to address.

11:40 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Next-generation infrastructure needs to be responsive to user behaviour
Aernout van der Bend, director general, NGInfra (Next Generation Infrastructures), NETHERLANDS
NGInfra is the Dutch alliance of cross-sectoral infrastructure owners/asset managers. The partners (national authorities of roads, railways, electricity, water supply, main ports of Rotterdam and Schiphol) recognise the importance of sharing interdisciplinary knowledge, experiences and data, and want to achieve responsive connections. Three major societal changes: data revolution, energy revolution and urban revolution. For infrastructure to deliver societal value, it will have to be responsive. Think about new ways of decision making, cross boundaries of organisations, be data heavy, foster innovation, deal with growing uncertainty and provide more flexibility. Our aim is to create an international network on this basis.

14:30 - How to inject capital into transportation infrastructure build-out?
Boris Galonske, managing director, Silverbergh Partners, SWITZERLAND
Although infrastructure is high on the agenda of the public sector as well as of investors, matching an investment opportunity with capital remains challenging. Initiators of infrastructure projects as well investors need to achieve a common understanding of the opportunity. Risk-return preferences of the investor need to be met. Hence, we will investigate aspects that are important to understand to create a match, e.g. today's infrastructure financing landscape, financing needs and activity, investor types, means of financing, project characteristics, the role of public vs. private funds.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Future transportation funding – road charging worldwide best practices
Scott Wilson, director, D'Artagnan Pacific, D'Artagnan Consulting LLP, UK
This paper presents a high-level analysis of key issues that should be considered for implementation of 'road charge' or distance-based charge based on distance driven rather than fuel consumed. The speaker will address lessons learned from the US states of California, Oregon and Washington, and from countries around the world using this alternative funding mechanism for their future sustainable transportation funding policies. The emphasis will be on a list of identified issues/consideration of critical next steps and thinking around the world as states and countries struggle with fuels excise taxes in the future market of efficient and economic vehicles.

16:00 - 17:00 - Round Table Discussion
– Challenges and Opportunities for Sustainable Financing and Funding for Future Infrastructure and Mobility Projects
Jeannet van Arum, director smart mobility, Provincie Noord-Holland, NETHERLANDS
Aernout van der Bend, director general, NGInfra (Next Generation Infrastructures), NETHERLANDS
Richard Blyth, head of policy practice and research, Royal Town Planning Institute, UK


Moderator:
Christian Bocci, senior partner, Weston Williamson + Partners

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

INFRASTRUCTURE AND PROJECT FUNDING
Meeting Room North

Moderator
Richard Blyth, head of policy practice and research, Royal Town Planning Institute, UK

09:00 - The future of infrastructure funding
Dr Dejan Makovšek, economist, International Transport Forum at the OECD, FRANCE
Policy makers often confuse the terms 'funding' and 'financing'. Without funding, there can be no financing. Funding can come from the users (user charging) or the taxpayers. When private financing is involved, user charging normally implies the transfer of demand risk. Are user charges a safer source of funding than taxpayers? When does it make sense to transfer demand risk? What will the future bring? How will vehicle automation and 'smartness' affect future infrastructure demand and who should be bearing that risk?

09:30 - Transport – the wider benefits
Richard Blyth, head of policy practice and research, Royal Town Planning Institute, UK
Many countries have two problems: (1) how to finance transport investment and (2) how to support growing cities. The presentation will demonstrate that widening the measures for assessing the benefits of transport investment can increase its changes of funding and the chances that it will support economic growth.

10:00 - Reaping bitter harvest or great benefits – time to act!
Dr Tor Skoglund, senior researcher, Sweco, SWEDEN
The rapid development of highly automated and connected transport will become a game changer. The stark contrast between the speed at which automation is adopted by individuals and the speed at which societies respond will, however, render unwanted effects. Urgent decisions on how to shape future cities and infrastructure will therefore need to be based on a combination of knowledge about what drives behavioural change of individuals as well as an expertise in transport system design. Methods, metrics and measures for successful prediction and sculpting of societal effects from transport automation will be presented.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - Transport-orientated development – tomorrow's garden city
Christian Bocci, senior partner, Weston Williamson + Partners, UK
The way we move around and between our cities will change dramatically in the next 25 years. The last wave of new towns were designed with the car as the principal method of transport, with the railway station at the extremity of the city and giant car parks at its heart. WW+P, building on 30 years of infrastructure design, is developing proposals for a transport-orientated development. Based around public transport, with a high-speed railway station at its centre, it will be a car-free 2.5km radial city, housing 350,000 people in a green and pleasant land.

11:30 - New mobility: challenges and new positioning for the infrastructure industry
Rafael Moreno Cela, operations manager, OHL Concesiones, SPAIN
Several forces are shaping and challenging highways and the infrastructure industry: climate change, urbanisation, technological innovation, demographic shifts and the changing behaviour of travellers. The infrastructure industry is also dealing with the sharing economy, which allows the emergence of new business models that challenge traditional ones and force in some way their transformation. For companies and administrations committed to DBFOM projects, thinking about these trends, new concepts, emerging solutions and issues allows them to look beyond day-to-day activities towards a better understanding of the long-term challenges, and paves the way for a transition to new business models focused on service, technology and sustainability.

12:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

INFRASTRUCTURE AND PROJECT FUNDING
Meeting Room North

Moderator
Christian Bocci, senior partner, Weston Williamson + Partners, UK

10:10 - Smart mobility pilots near Amsterdam
Jeannet van Arum, director smart mobility, Provincie Noord-Holland, NETHERLANDS
In the Metropolitan Region of Amsterdam, the Province of Noord-Holland is doing pilots on smart mobility for the future. The focus of these projects is in communication with traffic lights, learning from the introduction of autonomous cars. We collaborate with, for instance, Nissan, the future bus of Daimler-Benz, University of Delft, and several service providers like KPN, Vialis, Swarco and Technolution. The pilots are done under public-private partnerships where all parties contribute in kind and in budget.

10:40 - Impact of the physical internet on sustainable logistics and transportation
Steffen Kaup, head of future innovation transport and logistics, Daimler AG, GERMANY
By 2050, the volume of goods that are transported will have increased by around 55%. That just wouldn’t be possible with the traffic infrastructure as we know it today. An innovative approach is to face the growing transport demand with a synchromodal transport system. Synchromodal is a synthesis of ‘synchro’, meaning occurring at the same time, and ‘intermodal’, referring to multiple means of transport. The model for this system is the internet and its forerunners. A similar solution might also be conceivable for the transport of physical goods, also called the Physical Internet.

11:10 - Future of transport and mobility technology in Dubai - potentials and obstacles to progress
Zeina Nazer, secretary general & director, ITS Arab & Innova Consulting, UK
It is imperative to improve and develop a secure and sustainable transportation system to serve the increasingly high concentration of people living in urban areas and the demand for higher levels of service and information regarding transport services (such as real time updates on bus and train schedules), transportation needs now have much more complex solutions than simply building new roads or rail lines. Innovative technology-driven approaches are required to meet these demands. Emerging Technologies are playing a central role in Dubai. The integration of technology with transport systems became a given — particularly with the move towards the development of Dubai Smart City. We will focus on the autonomous vehicles shuttles which are currently operating and the Personal Air Transport Systems (PATS) which are due to start flying this year. Touching on funding for such radical technologies and the wider socioeconomic impact, plus the accompanying infrastructure challenges. While those emerging technologies present opportunities to improve users convenience, they also presents a major challenge to ensuring those changes do not introduce a significantly higher level of security and privacy related risks for their users. Also, questions arise such as where will the funding for such radical technologies come from and what are the social and economic impacts. Last but not least, we will cover the accompanying infrastructure challenges. The challenges listed above will undoubtedly require a co-operative effort between governments, transport bodies, and supply chain partners to address.

11:40 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Next-generation infrastructure needs to be responsive to user behaviour
Aernout van der Bend, director general, NGInfra (Next Generation Infrastructures), NETHERLANDS
NGInfra is the Dutch alliance of cross-sectoral infrastructure owners/asset managers. The partners (national authorities of roads, railways, electricity, water supply, main ports of Rotterdam and Schiphol) recognise the importance of sharing interdisciplinary knowledge, experiences and data, and want to achieve responsive connections. Three major societal changes: data revolution, energy revolution and urban revolution. For infrastructure to deliver societal value, it will have to be responsive. Think about new ways of decision making, cross boundaries of organisations, be data heavy, foster innovation, deal with growing uncertainty and provide more flexibility. Our aim is to create an international network on this basis.

14:30 - How to inject capital into transportation infrastructure build-out?
Boris Galonske, managing director, Silverbergh Partners, SWITZERLAND
Although infrastructure is high on the agenda of the public sector as well as of investors, matching an investment opportunity with capital remains challenging. Initiators of infrastructure projects as well investors need to achieve a common understanding of the opportunity. Risk-return preferences of the investor need to be met. Hence, we will investigate aspects that are important to understand to create a match, e.g. today's infrastructure financing landscape, financing needs and activity, investor types, means of financing, project characteristics, the role of public vs. private funds.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Future transportation funding – road charging worldwide best practices
Scott Wilson, director, D'Artagnan Pacific, D'Artagnan Consulting LLP, UK
This paper presents a high-level analysis of key issues that should be considered for implementation of 'road charge' or distance-based charge based on distance driven rather than fuel consumed. The speaker will address lessons learned from the US states of California, Oregon and Washington, and from countries around the world using this alternative funding mechanism for their future sustainable transportation funding policies. The emphasis will be on a list of identified issues/consideration of critical next steps and thinking around the world as states and countries struggle with fuels excise taxes in the future market of efficient and economic vehicles.

16:00 - 17:00 - Round Table Discussion
– Challenges and Opportunities for Sustainable Financing and Funding for Future Infrastructure and Mobility Projects
Jeannet van Arum, director smart mobility, Provincie Noord-Holland, NETHERLANDS
Aernout van der Bend, director general, NGInfra (Next Generation Infrastructures), NETHERLANDS
Richard Blyth, head of policy practice and research, Royal Town Planning Institute, UK


Moderator:
Christian Bocci, senior partner, Weston Williamson + Partners

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

INFRASTRUCTURE AND PROJECT FUNDING
Meeting Room North

Moderator
Richard Blyth, head of policy practice and research, Royal Town Planning Institute, UK

09:00 - The future of infrastructure funding
Dr Dejan Makovšek, economist, International Transport Forum at the OECD, FRANCE
Policy makers often confuse the terms 'funding' and 'financing'. Without funding, there can be no financing. Funding can come from the users (user charging) or the taxpayers. When private financing is involved, user charging normally implies the transfer of demand risk. Are user charges a safer source of funding than taxpayers? When does it make sense to transfer demand risk? What will the future bring? How will vehicle automation and 'smartness' affect future infrastructure demand and who should be bearing that risk?

09:30 - Transport – the wider benefits
Richard Blyth, head of policy practice and research, Royal Town Planning Institute, UK
Many countries have two problems: (1) how to finance transport investment and (2) how to support growing cities. The presentation will demonstrate that widening the measures for assessing the benefits of transport investment can increase its changes of funding and the chances that it will support economic growth.

10:00 - Reaping bitter harvest or great benefits – time to act!
Dr Tor Skoglund, senior researcher, Sweco, SWEDEN
The rapid development of highly automated and connected transport will become a game changer. The stark contrast between the speed at which automation is adopted by individuals and the speed at which societies respond will, however, render unwanted effects. Urgent decisions on how to shape future cities and infrastructure will therefore need to be based on a combination of knowledge about what drives behavioural change of individuals as well as an expertise in transport system design. Methods, metrics and measures for successful prediction and sculpting of societal effects from transport automation will be presented.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - Transport-orientated development – tomorrow's garden city
Christian Bocci, senior partner, Weston Williamson + Partners, UK
The way we move around and between our cities will change dramatically in the next 25 years. The last wave of new towns were designed with the car as the principal method of transport, with the railway station at the extremity of the city and giant car parks at its heart. WW+P, building on 30 years of infrastructure design, is developing proposals for a transport-orientated development. Based around public transport, with a high-speed railway station at its centre, it will be a car-free 2.5km radial city, housing 350,000 people in a green and pleasant land.

11:30 - New mobility: challenges and new positioning for the infrastructure industry
Rafael Moreno Cela, operations manager, OHL Concesiones, SPAIN
Several forces are shaping and challenging highways and the infrastructure industry: climate change, urbanisation, technological innovation, demographic shifts and the changing behaviour of travellers. The infrastructure industry is also dealing with the sharing economy, which allows the emergence of new business models that challenge traditional ones and force in some way their transformation. For companies and administrations committed to DBFOM projects, thinking about these trends, new concepts, emerging solutions and issues allows them to look beyond day-to-day activities towards a better understanding of the long-term challenges, and paves the way for a transition to new business models focused on service, technology and sustainability.

12:00 - 14:00 - Lunch


Where will the investment for the future of transport come from? What business opportunities will new mobility solutions create? What impact will they have on jobs? The Future of Transportation World Conference will discuss and investigate how disruptive technologies will affect the thousands of people employed throughout various transportation networks and what new opportunities they could create.