Environmental Sustainability

All Streams are across 2 days

Conference Schedule


Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

11:10 - 17:00 - ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
Meeting Room 1 / 2

Moderator
Dr Zia Wadud, associate professor, University of Leeds, UK

11:10 - Strategic planning for disruptive innovation in mobility
Dr Gereon Meyer, head of strategic projects, VDI/VDE Innovation + Technik GmbH, GERMANY
Automation and connectivity, as well as electrification, are the big drivers of progress in road-based and other transportation modes. In combination with smart integrated solutions and new service models, these technologies can unfold potential for truly disruptive innovation, leading to a whole new mobility system that makes travel cheaper, cleaner and more accessible, particularly in cities. This presentation provides a comprehensive review of recent attempts to plan strategic research and innovation in Europe from the perspectives of public authorities, industries and users. It covers (a) the Strategic Transport Research and Innovation Agenda – a set of seven roadmaps dedicated to specific issues across all transport modes, edited for the European Commission; (b) the European Roadmap Electrification of Road Transport and the European Roadmap Smart Systems for Automated Driving, edited by the European Technology Platforms ERTRAC and EPoSS; (c) the Action Plan for the Future of Mobility in Europe, resulting from the user-centric planning process within a publicly funded project, Mobility4EU. This presentation summarises the various actions, the stakeholder consultation processes they build on, and their conclusions on how to plan the future transformation of the European mobility system in an inclusive way.

11:40 - ITS innovations for mobility to increase the environmental sustainability of transport
Josef Czako, CEO, Moving Forward Consulting Ltd, GERMANY
Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) have been proved worldwide to deliver better road safety, increase efficiency, reduce congestion, ensure financing and foster environmentally friendly mobility. Recent major innovations in mobility are: self-driving cars, mobility as a service (MaaS) and mobility pricing. We need to acknowledge that these innovations are happening around us, due to digitalisation, automation and servitisation. The presentation makes a global analysis of their strengths, opportunities, weaknesses and threats (SWOT), and also explains proper policies and strategies for deployment.

12:10 - Does the internal combustion engine have a viable future?
Dr Marc Stettler, lecturer in Transport and the Environment, Imperial College London, UK
Concentrating on emissions, Dr Marc Stettler, will look at proprietary data from more than 1,400 vehicles tested by Emissions Analytics and discuss whether the ICE can meet the demands of ever-increasing emissions standards. He will also consider the impact autonomous vehicles may have on emissions, using data from a study between Imperial College London and Emissions Analytics, which examined how pollutants can be reduced when driving decisions are automated.

12:40 - 14:00 - Lunch

Moderator
Dr Marc Stettler, lecturer in Transport and the Environment, Imperial College London, UK

14:00 - Energy-independent vehicles: a bigger market than autonomous vehicles
Dr Lorenzo Grande, technology analyst, IDTechEX, GERMANY
Vehicles by land, water and air that are autonomous in navigation and task are gaining all the attention, but their hardware is being commoditised. Adoption is limited. The 'next big thing' will have a larger impact. Think of energy-independent electric vehicles (EIV) such as the Canadian sun-powered helium-filled aerofoils carrying 30 tonnes, Chinese and German mainstream solar cars soon on sale, Italian wind/sun pizza van licensing, solar drones in the upper atmosphere for 5-10 years soon. Electricity utilities and charging networks bypassed: less battery or no battery suffices. Hear the findings of the new IDTechEx report, 'Energy Independent Electric Vehicles 2017-2037'.

14:30 - Fiscal aspects of smart charging
Baerte de Brey, chief international operations, ElaadNL, NETHERLANDS
The Netherlands is one of the leaders in the field of electric transport. The growth of EVs results in a growing availability of storage capacity in the Dutch electricity network. This storage capacity can be used for smart charging, which means the adjustment of the way, the speed and the time of loading, to meet the market and network conditions. It solves congestion and imbalance situations in the network. In the future these situations will increase, due to the growth of EVs and sustainable (decentralised) power. ElaadNL has identified the tax barriers that hinder smart charging.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - EV batteries monetization: concept & approach
Giovanni Coppola, Enel SpA, ITALY
The presentation will explain how Enel is transforming car owners into producers of services to stabilise the Danish electric grid, and how Enel will soon do the same in the UK, Germany and the Netherlands. We allow electric car owners to make money when their cars aren't running, just by connecting them to the charger. We are already doing it, making real money, in Denmark.

16:00 - Automated vehicles – automatically low carbon?
Dr Zia Wadud, associate professor, University of Leeds, UK
The presentation discusses the potential impacts of fully automated vehicles. It draws on the author's recent work such as 'Help or hindrance? The travel, energy and carbon impacts of highly automated vehicles', 'Automated vehicles: automatically low carbon' and recent ongoing work on adoption of these vehicles – especially in the context of automated mobility services.

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
Meeting Room 1 / 2

Moderator
Josef Czako, CEO, Moving Forward Consulting Ltd, GERMANY

09:00 - Electrified heavy-duty road transport
Benjamin Wickert, head of business development eHighway, Siemens AG, GERMANY
To meet constraints faced by road freight in terms of significantly lowering or reducing CO2 emissions and improving air quality, an electric road system (ERS) based on an overhead contact line (OCL)-hybrid heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) has been designed, developed, tested and demonstrated. The ERS demonstrated has twice the energy efficiency of conventional diesel HDVs and enables usage of renewable energy. The ERS can be integrated with existing infrastructure, thus making it easier and cheaper to implement and maintain. Lower energy consumption yields lower operating costs, and the resulting savings can finance the infrastructure investment.

09:30 - Inductive (wireless) charging – the road to sustainable mobility?
Dave OudeNijeweme, managing consultant, E4tech, UK
Electrification – especially of light-duty transportation – is generally accepted as the only available way to achieve the ambitious targets agreed in Paris. Governments have passed legislation that in effect requires increasing market penetration of zero-emission-capable vehicles. In this paper we will examine car utilisation now and in the future, and the impact this might have on the level of GHG reduction xEVs could bring under different transport scenarios. We further examine how inductive charging could significantly increase the number of miles driven on electricity.

10:00 - A sustainable future transport system - how will we move?
Steven Wilkins, Senior Research Scientist, TNO, NETHERLANDS
Transport accounts for a significant portion of Europe’s CO2 emission and energy consumption, and it has a huge influence on land use. Major developments like electrification of transport, connected and automated transport as well as Mobility as a Service and shared ownership of vehicles will drastically change our transport options. A systems approach is essential to make best use of all transport modes and the latest technological developments. Thus, e.g. in reducing fuel consumption and emissions, not only the vehicles should be optimised, but the full chain from well-to-wheel and the actual availability of energy. Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans and their execution can play a key role in delivering sustainable and future proof mobility for both people and goods. To create and maintain a sustainable, flexible, user-friendly and affordable European transport system, cooperation amongst stakeholders like cities, industry, research and Member States is essential.

10:30 - 11:30 - Break

11:30 - Getting to zero-carbon freight transport: the role of regulation
Stef Cornelis, Safer and Cleaner Trucks Officer, Transport & Environment, BELGIUM
Trucks are the cause of almost 30% of CO2 emissions from road transport. This share will only increase in the future as cars become both more efficient and electric. This presentation will outline the way in which we can transition to a clean freight transport system and the role of new technologies (truck electrification, truck/roadside ITS and 3PL apps) in doing so. What can the policy maker do to promote the adoption and use of such technologies by OEMs and freight companies? Are carrots or sticks the best way forward? Is it possible to get to zero emission?

12:00 - Driverless cars – they will kill the city and save the suburbs
David Green, principal, global practice leader, Perkins+Will, UK
Driverless cars will radically transform the city and suburbs but in exactly the opposite way that most people believe. Instead of being the saviours of our cities, they will provide the justification for the retention and expansion of the 20th century suburban development model. They will do this because they will simultaneously solve the problem of modern road congestion while increasing the convenience with which we all move about in cars. In order to understand this, one must understand a similar situation that unfolded a century ago when the new technology wasn’t driverless cars, but cars with drivers.

12:30 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Climate-proofing the air transportation of the future
Rachel Burbidge, environment policy officer, Eurocontrol, BELGIUM
Forget capacity, emissions and drones – the impact of climate change may be one of the biggest challenges for the global aviation sector to tackle. This presentation will look at the potential impacts to be faced, how to assess the risks and develop an adaptation strategy for your organisation, the balance between risks, costs and criticality, and the types of resilience measures that are available. It will explain why well-planned pre-emptive action can both limit risk and be cost-effective – and why capacity, emissions and drones all have a role to play.

14:30 - Mobility in the future (2030) – first nationwide opinion study
Marco Maréchal, strategic (communication) advisor, Connected Strategic Change Processes, NETHERLANDS
Our world is dominated by technology, and that is a good thing. But in the end people and stakeholders have to embrace the new norms of mobility, like self-driving cars. Is it not time to know what people want, what they want the new norms of mobility to be? What are the knowledge, behaviour and attitude towards these issues? If we know this, we can make new services and products and create mass so people will buy them. We conducted the first nationwide survey on this topic and wrote a bestselling book about new mobility.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

Panel Moderator - Round Table Discussion
Steven Wilkins, Senior Research Scientist, TNO, NETHERLANDS

15:30 - 17:00 - Round Table Discussion
– How will New Transportation Technology Ensure an Environmentally Sustainable Future? What and Who will Fuel Future Mobility Solutions? How can Transportation Become Energy-Independent?
David Green, principal, global practice leader, Perkins+Will, UK
Josef Czako, CEO, Moving Forward Consulting Ltd, GERMANY
Stef Cornelis, Safer and Cleaner Trucks Officer, Transport & Environment, BELGIUM


Moderator:
Margriet van Schijndel-de Nooij, secretary general, European Automotive Research Partners Association

Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

11:10 - 17:00 - ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
Meeting Room 1 / 2

Moderator
Dr Zia Wadud, associate professor, University of Leeds, UK

11:10 - Strategic planning for disruptive innovation in mobility
Dr Gereon Meyer, head of strategic projects, VDI/VDE Innovation + Technik GmbH, GERMANY
Automation and connectivity, as well as electrification, are the big drivers of progress in road-based and other transportation modes. In combination with smart integrated solutions and new service models, these technologies can unfold potential for truly disruptive innovation, leading to a whole new mobility system that makes travel cheaper, cleaner and more accessible, particularly in cities. This presentation provides a comprehensive review of recent attempts to plan strategic research and innovation in Europe from the perspectives of public authorities, industries and users. It covers (a) the Strategic Transport Research and Innovation Agenda – a set of seven roadmaps dedicated to specific issues across all transport modes, edited for the European Commission; (b) the European Roadmap Electrification of Road Transport and the European Roadmap Smart Systems for Automated Driving, edited by the European Technology Platforms ERTRAC and EPoSS; (c) the Action Plan for the Future of Mobility in Europe, resulting from the user-centric planning process within a publicly funded project, Mobility4EU. This presentation summarises the various actions, the stakeholder consultation processes they build on, and their conclusions on how to plan the future transformation of the European mobility system in an inclusive way.

11:40 - ITS innovations for mobility to increase the environmental sustainability of transport
Josef Czako, CEO, Moving Forward Consulting Ltd, GERMANY
Intelligent transportation systems (ITS) have been proved worldwide to deliver better road safety, increase efficiency, reduce congestion, ensure financing and foster environmentally friendly mobility. Recent major innovations in mobility are: self-driving cars, mobility as a service (MaaS) and mobility pricing. We need to acknowledge that these innovations are happening around us, due to digitalisation, automation and servitisation. The presentation makes a global analysis of their strengths, opportunities, weaknesses and threats (SWOT), and also explains proper policies and strategies for deployment.

12:10 - Does the internal combustion engine have a viable future?
Dr Marc Stettler, lecturer in Transport and the Environment, Imperial College London, UK
Concentrating on emissions, Dr Marc Stettler, will look at proprietary data from more than 1,400 vehicles tested by Emissions Analytics and discuss whether the ICE can meet the demands of ever-increasing emissions standards. He will also consider the impact autonomous vehicles may have on emissions, using data from a study between Imperial College London and Emissions Analytics, which examined how pollutants can be reduced when driving decisions are automated.

12:40 - 14:00 - Lunch

Moderator
Dr Marc Stettler, lecturer in Transport and the Environment, Imperial College London, UK

14:00 - Energy-independent vehicles: a bigger market than autonomous vehicles
Dr Lorenzo Grande, technology analyst, IDTechEX, GERMANY
Vehicles by land, water and air that are autonomous in navigation and task are gaining all the attention, but their hardware is being commoditised. Adoption is limited. The 'next big thing' will have a larger impact. Think of energy-independent electric vehicles (EIV) such as the Canadian sun-powered helium-filled aerofoils carrying 30 tonnes, Chinese and German mainstream solar cars soon on sale, Italian wind/sun pizza van licensing, solar drones in the upper atmosphere for 5-10 years soon. Electricity utilities and charging networks bypassed: less battery or no battery suffices. Hear the findings of the new IDTechEx report, 'Energy Independent Electric Vehicles 2017-2037'.

14:30 - Fiscal aspects of smart charging
Baerte de Brey, chief international operations, ElaadNL, NETHERLANDS
The Netherlands is one of the leaders in the field of electric transport. The growth of EVs results in a growing availability of storage capacity in the Dutch electricity network. This storage capacity can be used for smart charging, which means the adjustment of the way, the speed and the time of loading, to meet the market and network conditions. It solves congestion and imbalance situations in the network. In the future these situations will increase, due to the growth of EVs and sustainable (decentralised) power. ElaadNL has identified the tax barriers that hinder smart charging.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - EV batteries monetization: concept & approach
Giovanni Coppola, Enel SpA, ITALY
The presentation will explain how Enel is transforming car owners into producers of services to stabilise the Danish electric grid, and how Enel will soon do the same in the UK, Germany and the Netherlands. We allow electric car owners to make money when their cars aren't running, just by connecting them to the charger. We are already doing it, making real money, in Denmark.

16:00 - Automated vehicles – automatically low carbon?
Dr Zia Wadud, associate professor, University of Leeds, UK
The presentation discusses the potential impacts of fully automated vehicles. It draws on the author's recent work such as 'Help or hindrance? The travel, energy and carbon impacts of highly automated vehicles', 'Automated vehicles: automatically low carbon' and recent ongoing work on adoption of these vehicles – especially in the context of automated mobility services.

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY
Meeting Room 1 / 2

Moderator
Josef Czako, CEO, Moving Forward Consulting Ltd, GERMANY

09:00 - Electrified heavy-duty road transport
Benjamin Wickert, head of business development eHighway, Siemens AG, GERMANY
To meet constraints faced by road freight in terms of significantly lowering or reducing CO2 emissions and improving air quality, an electric road system (ERS) based on an overhead contact line (OCL)-hybrid heavy-duty vehicle (HDV) has been designed, developed, tested and demonstrated. The ERS demonstrated has twice the energy efficiency of conventional diesel HDVs and enables usage of renewable energy. The ERS can be integrated with existing infrastructure, thus making it easier and cheaper to implement and maintain. Lower energy consumption yields lower operating costs, and the resulting savings can finance the infrastructure investment.

09:30 - Inductive (wireless) charging – the road to sustainable mobility?
Dave OudeNijeweme, managing consultant, E4tech, UK
Electrification – especially of light-duty transportation – is generally accepted as the only available way to achieve the ambitious targets agreed in Paris. Governments have passed legislation that in effect requires increasing market penetration of zero-emission-capable vehicles. In this paper we will examine car utilisation now and in the future, and the impact this might have on the level of GHG reduction xEVs could bring under different transport scenarios. We further examine how inductive charging could significantly increase the number of miles driven on electricity.

10:00 - A sustainable future transport system - how will we move?
Steven Wilkins, Senior Research Scientist, TNO, NETHERLANDS
Transport accounts for a significant portion of Europe’s CO2 emission and energy consumption, and it has a huge influence on land use. Major developments like electrification of transport, connected and automated transport as well as Mobility as a Service and shared ownership of vehicles will drastically change our transport options. A systems approach is essential to make best use of all transport modes and the latest technological developments. Thus, e.g. in reducing fuel consumption and emissions, not only the vehicles should be optimised, but the full chain from well-to-wheel and the actual availability of energy. Sustainable Urban Mobility Plans and their execution can play a key role in delivering sustainable and future proof mobility for both people and goods. To create and maintain a sustainable, flexible, user-friendly and affordable European transport system, cooperation amongst stakeholders like cities, industry, research and Member States is essential.

10:30 - 11:30 - Break

11:30 - Getting to zero-carbon freight transport: the role of regulation
Stef Cornelis, Safer and Cleaner Trucks Officer, Transport & Environment, BELGIUM
Trucks are the cause of almost 30% of CO2 emissions from road transport. This share will only increase in the future as cars become both more efficient and electric. This presentation will outline the way in which we can transition to a clean freight transport system and the role of new technologies (truck electrification, truck/roadside ITS and 3PL apps) in doing so. What can the policy maker do to promote the adoption and use of such technologies by OEMs and freight companies? Are carrots or sticks the best way forward? Is it possible to get to zero emission?

12:00 - Driverless cars – they will kill the city and save the suburbs
David Green, principal, global practice leader, Perkins+Will, UK
Driverless cars will radically transform the city and suburbs but in exactly the opposite way that most people believe. Instead of being the saviours of our cities, they will provide the justification for the retention and expansion of the 20th century suburban development model. They will do this because they will simultaneously solve the problem of modern road congestion while increasing the convenience with which we all move about in cars. In order to understand this, one must understand a similar situation that unfolded a century ago when the new technology wasn’t driverless cars, but cars with drivers.

12:30 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Climate-proofing the air transportation of the future
Rachel Burbidge, environment policy officer, Eurocontrol, BELGIUM
Forget capacity, emissions and drones – the impact of climate change may be one of the biggest challenges for the global aviation sector to tackle. This presentation will look at the potential impacts to be faced, how to assess the risks and develop an adaptation strategy for your organisation, the balance between risks, costs and criticality, and the types of resilience measures that are available. It will explain why well-planned pre-emptive action can both limit risk and be cost-effective – and why capacity, emissions and drones all have a role to play.

14:30 - Mobility in the future (2030) – first nationwide opinion study
Marco Maréchal, strategic (communication) advisor, Connected Strategic Change Processes, NETHERLANDS
Our world is dominated by technology, and that is a good thing. But in the end people and stakeholders have to embrace the new norms of mobility, like self-driving cars. Is it not time to know what people want, what they want the new norms of mobility to be? What are the knowledge, behaviour and attitude towards these issues? If we know this, we can make new services and products and create mass so people will buy them. We conducted the first nationwide survey on this topic and wrote a bestselling book about new mobility.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

Panel Moderator - Round Table Discussion
Steven Wilkins, Senior Research Scientist, TNO, NETHERLANDS

15:30 - 17:00 - Round Table Discussion
– How will New Transportation Technology Ensure an Environmentally Sustainable Future? What and Who will Fuel Future Mobility Solutions? How can Transportation Become Energy-Independent?
David Green, principal, global practice leader, Perkins+Will, UK
Josef Czako, CEO, Moving Forward Consulting Ltd, GERMANY
Stef Cornelis, Safer and Cleaner Trucks Officer, Transport & Environment, BELGIUM


Moderator:
Margriet van Schijndel-de Nooij, secretary general, European Automotive Research Partners Association


In this session we will look into how highways of the future will need to evolve into highly automated and intelligent superfast transportation networks capable of generating energy and charging vehicles as they travel. New technology innovations could allow highways to heal themselves, or automated robots to help carry out repairs quickly and efficiently, thereby dramatically reducing maintenance costs. Solar technology could allow road networks and transportation authorities to generate their own electricity, which would allow highways in the future to not only be completely energy independent, but also providers of energy. As we start to see the demise of the internal combustion engine, will petrol stations become redundant? How will advances in technology, population increase and future emission regulations support economic growth, and how will business models change?