The Challenge for Rail

All Streams are across 2 days

Conference Schedule


Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

THE CHALLENGE FOR RAIL
Meeting Room 5

Moderator
Dr Libor Lochman, executive director, CER - The Voice of European Railways, BELGIUM

10:10 - Key challenges of European rail policy
Dr Libor Lochman, executive director, CER - The Voice of European Railways, BELGIUM
The European rail sector is today having the opportunity of a renewed renaissance: the mix of the provisions agreed in the Fourth Railway Package together with the progressive digitalisation of the EU economy offer the base for making the railways the backbone of the EU’s logistics network (for both passenger and freight) and of its economy at large. Succeeding with this strategy will enable rail to become an essential part of the intermodal, door-to-door services. Still there are remaining issues of the existing unbalanced playing field between rail and other transport modes that need to be resolved in order to benefit fully from the potential of railways.

10:40 - The Future of Rail 2050
Cem Budak, director - European rail leader, ARUP, TURKEY
Megatrends such as rapid urbanisation, population growth, technological advances and climate change have far-reaching implications for the future world in which rail will operate. Beyond these macro forces, changes will also be driven by the evolving needs and expectations of future passengers. Future of Rail 2050 focuses on the passenger experience, and sets out a forward-looking, inspiring vision for rail. The user journeys imagined here are intended to generate a conversation about the world ahead and provide the big picture context for future planning and decision-making by governments and the rail industry. The hope is that the rail industry will move forward with innovation based not solely on past experiences but also on future possibilities and preferred outcomes.

11:10 - Mobility hotspots – innovative design as a railway regeneration enabler
Dominique Laousse, head of innovation and prospective, SNCF, FRANCE
Transportation is global societal disruption initiated by daily uses mutation during the current urban age. Based on new relations to individual times, life spaces and the personal technological bubble, the need for innovation is shifting from transport to mobility. Regenerating the railway focuses on mobility hotspots, with an innovative design challenge to connect all transport modes in a user-friendly/mass-transit-orientated way. Distributed places will help to mix the static and mobile functions of railway and new mobility modes whose pulses could be revealed and managed based on chronotopic analysis to match user expectations, providing renewed urbanity and civility for more sustainable cities.

11:40 - How the 'big 3' technologies shape the future of transportation
Bhoopathi Rapolu, head of analytics, EMEA, Cyient, UK
Internet of Things (IoT), AI and 3D printing are our newfound abilities to shape the future as we want it. Rail transportation is neither indifferent nor aloof to them. They are radically transforming the rail industry in: understanding transportation systems like never before; automating parts of train manufacturing, operations and business decision making; predicting outcomes – passenger response, system failures, part replacements, maintenance plans, financial implications and many more. This session will outline leading ideas, practical methodologies and case studies explaining how the big 3 technologies are shaping the future of rail transportation.

12:10 - Future planning and present problem-solving
Paul Priestman, designer/chairman, PriestmanGoode, UK
While R&D into future modes of transport and the long-term direction of rail is undoubtedly important, we must not lose sight of the fact that our current infrastructure is under huge strain and that we need solutions that we can start to implement now. Paul Priestman, designer, future thinker and chairman of leading global transport design consultancy PriestmanGoode will speak about the challenges the rail industry is facing today, and present two innovative solutions to cope with growing passenger numbers.

12:40 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Multi-Modal mobility
Jeremy White, head of transport, Seymour Powell, UK
Over hundreds of years, we have developed an infrastructure of rail, road and water ways. These connect our cities and are essential to the future development of our economy. I will explore how an interconnected world of multi modal transport will lead to a seamless passenger experience and how rail will play a key part in this execution. Uncoupled autonomous rail vehicles will provide flexibility for passengers and operators. This will encourage rail travel, increase efficiency while meeting the capacity demands of the future.

14:30 - Railway futures
Dr Roberto Palacin, senior research associate/lead for Rail Systems Group, Newcastle University, UK
The presentation will explore the opportunities that lie ahead for railways as part of a future transport system. These include their potential role as the core mass-transit providers in metropolitan areas using mobility solutions based around the idea of MaaS as well as other opportunities maximising rail's inherent advantages, including energy aspects, connectivity and safety. The audience will also be given a peek at what a future rail system might look like.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - The future of railways is in orchestrating door-to-door journeys
Dr Hans Moonen, management consultant, CGI, NETHERLANDS
The future of railways will be dramatically different. In a world where passengers are always on, cars travel autonomously and transport is increasingly consumed-as-a-service, railways seem to remain traditional companies with a slow pace of innovation. Research confirms that even frequent train travellers mostly appreciate the time aboard the train, but experience the time before and after the train journey as rather stressful. The sector thus has a challenge to remain relevant and attractive in the changing world of mobility. This presentation reveals a (fact-supported) vision for railway operators to develop into mobility orchestrators mastering their clients’ door-to-door journeys.

16:00 - High-speed rail in Central Europe: bottleneck between East and West
Petr Šlegr, project manager, Centre for Efficient Transport, CZECH REPUBLIC
High-speed rail in the Czech Republic has been discussed for more than 10 years, without real progress being made. There is a similar situation in other Central European countries, mainly the post-Communist ones. Without high-speed rail, the public transport in those countries is still not competitive in terms of domestic and international transport. There is a bottleneck between Eastern and Western Europe – some borders still seem to be behind the Iron Curtain. Will TEN-T policy change this situation? What are the major opportunities of HSR in Central Europe?

16:30 - 17:00 - Round Table Discussion
- How can Rail Stay Competitive Against New Mobility Solution Providers and Autonomous Vehicles? Can the Railway Industry Survive the Threat from New Mobility Solutions and What Changes are Required for their Long Term Sustainability? Panelists to be confirmed shortly will include Rail Operators, a Key Rail Institution and a government initiative
Giorgio Travaini, head of research and innovation AI, Shift2Rail, BELGIUM
Dominique Laousse, head of innovation and prospective, SNCF, FRANCE
Dr Mark van Hagen, principal consultant customer experience, NS (Netherlands Railways), NETHERLANDS
Christian Wolmar, award winning writer and broadcaster specialising in transport, Christian Wolmar, UK
Nick Brooks, head of EU affairs, Trainline, FRANCE


Moderator:
Libor Lochman, executive director, CER - The Voice of European Railways

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

THE CHALLENGE FOR RAIL
Meeting Room 5

Moderator
Joan Amorós, president, Ferrmed, ASBL, BELGIUM

09:00 - Digital railways: the backbone of the mobility of tomorrow
Francis Bedel, chief digital officer, International Union of Railways, FRANCE
UIC is a technical platform, at the service of its members around the world. It is committed to pragmatic solutions that bring added value to the railway sector and industry. Last year, UIC decided to create a digital platform that aims to share creative ideas, ensure harmonisation, support new developments and boost innovation. It has identified three main areas of potential interest: security (in particular the crucial issue of cybersecurity, in which UIC is very involved), services and productivity.

09:30 - Smart-Rail – supply chain orientation of the rail freight sector
Ming Chen, senior consultant/project manager, TNO, NETHERLANDS
The current European rail freight market is a complex system involving a great number of different public and private stakeholders, who jointly manage the rail operation. In this situation, the improvements required to become more user orientated always require cooperation between several stakeholders. Smart-Rail is developing new business models facilitated by data/information exchange, which make improvements in the short term possible. Improvement of data exchange is also the start of a transition towards full automation of railways. This automated system should remove the need for bureaucracy and cooperation and will turn this 'machine organisation' into an 'organic organisation' (Mintzberg).

10:00 - Train service of the future – give customers what they want
Dr Mark van Hagen, principal consultant customer experience, NS (Netherlands Railways), NETHERLANDS
Joost van der Made, head of concept design and innovation, NS Rail, NETHERLANDS
Train operating companies (TOC) are keen to attract new customers. The way to be successful is high performance and making customers happy. As part of its strategy, at NS (Dutch Railways) the customer comes first and passenger satisfaction is now the number one target and performance indicator. NS supports this ambition with a wealth of insights into the drivers of passenger satisfaction. The key challenge is how to successfully convert these insights into action; meaningful innovation that drives successful business.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - The risks for an expanding railway
Christian Wolmar, award winning writer and broadcaster specialising in transport, Christian Wolmar, UK
On the face of it, rail has a bright future, with expansion being envisaged across the world. New metro lines in urban areas, high-speed lines linking towns and mineral railways are all being built across the world. However, rail faces a big challenge in competing with new forms of transport, adopting technology that will keep costs down and responding to safety concerns. The big challenge for rail is how to keep growing while still offering value for money.

11:30 - The unknown unknowns of future passenger journeys
Martin Darbyshire, CEO, Tangerine, UK
Unlocking innovation through a designer’s insight into the human behaviours of today, to create future experiences that meet the unmet desires of tomorrow. With almost three decades’ experience creating paradigm-shifting products, services and experiences for global brands such as British Airways, LG and Toyota, Martin provides a thoughtful snapshot of how design can create transport solutions with exceptional customer experiences that meet the unimagined future needs of passengers and providers.

12:00 - AeroLiner3000 – the capacity booster for British railways
Andreas Vogler, director, Andreas Vogler Studio, GERMANY
A train, which looks as if the future has already begun: AeroLiner3000. When aerospace designers (Andreas Vogler Studio) and aerospace engineers (German Aerospace Center) explore the future of rail travel, the outcome is low-carbon and light-weight. The train is so light, that it stabilizes with nose wings against flying out of the tracks. The propulsion system is the finest of mechatronics, making the train barely touch the rails. AeroLiner3000 is showing the potential of a realistic future of train travel.

12:30 - Railway as the mobility backbone of the future
Dr Kurt Fuchs, attorney, www.eisenbahnrecht.com, GERMANY
Railways are fast and capable of transporting many people or goods at the same time with little demand in terms of space and energy compared with other traffic carriers. They can form the ecological backbone for future travel and transportation. In metropolitan areas, railway-based public transport will be the only possibility to satisfy the increasing rush-hour traffic. For the railways to meet future requirements, we need silent and convenient vehicles and a massive extension of the railway network. However, long and complex planning processes hamper the necessary network extension. Therefore, new regulations on planning procedures are needed.

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

Moderator
James Nix, director, Freight and Climate, Transport & Environment, BELGIUM

14:00 - Next generation train for future intermodal transport
Dr Joachim Winter, senior scientist, Institute of Vehicle Concepts, German Aerospace Center (DLR), GERMANY
Worldwide there is a tendency that already large cities are growing to become mega cities. To manage a city of this size requires the use of digitalisation to make it smart. Thus a network of people and things will be able to rapidly exchange information by means of modern telecommunication and informatics capabilities. This can be used to enhance the traffic in smart cities by providing more mobility for many more people with less traffic. The electrification of cars will not mean the end of traffic jams – but car sharing and improved public transport will. In the same sense transport between smart cities over long distances will require fast, comfortable trains and well organised hub stations to handle the masses of people with short dwell times.

14:30 - Rail AGVs to transform rail into a container distribution network
Paul Van Bers, innovation manager and strategic B2B consultant, BersCo Consultancy, NETHERLANDS
Trains are suitable for bulk transportation, preferably on fixed lines. Train transportation of containers requires the forwarder to adapt to the train operator. Container and train are basically a mismatch, and the market share is only 10%. For container transportation, the train is a niche player, stuck in the middle between truck and barge. With the rail AGV concept, in which the optimal length is one intelligent self-propelled wagon, rail is again able to compete with trucks in the areas of flexibility, reaction time, service speed, availability, costs and individual service. This will be illuminated.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Smart, competitive cooperation – the future of rail systems
Miroslav Haltuf, independent consultant, H-Comp Consulting, CZECH REPUBLIC
The paper will deal with the new position of railway systems under the influence of the 4th Railway package, full liberalisation of railway operation and competition from the road and air industries. New technologies based on digitalisation, big data and IoT, along with innovation and research activities related to customer satisfaction, are the stimulators for rail's new role and position. Making the railway smart and ready for cooperation with other modes of transport is the only chance to keep it alive and ready for further development.

16:00 - Rail's three genetic technologies futureproof freight and passenger positioning
Dr David van der Meulen, managing member, Railway Corporate Strategy Close Corporation, SOUTH AFRICA
Distinguishing rail from all other modes, Supporting carries heavy loads by double-decking and double-stacking; Guiding supports high-speed with generous vehicle profiles; Coupling can reduce average headways. New transport forms cannot pretend to these domains, offering instead on-demand, customised, personalised service, using autonomous single vehicles. They require shorter headway, which increases the significance of dwell time, ultimately to demand parallel or off-line boarding and alighting, rather than serial like rail, which compounds system complexity. Small vehicles destroy fixed guideway capacity, but autonomous transport forms could wonderfully complement and expand rail's freight and passenger appeal in relation to logistics parks and lifestyle mobility.

Day 1

Wednesday 5 July

THE CHALLENGE FOR RAIL
Meeting Room 5

Moderator
Dr Libor Lochman, executive director, CER - The Voice of European Railways, BELGIUM

10:10 - Key challenges of European rail policy
Dr Libor Lochman, executive director, CER - The Voice of European Railways, BELGIUM
The European rail sector is today having the opportunity of a renewed renaissance: the mix of the provisions agreed in the Fourth Railway Package together with the progressive digitalisation of the EU economy offer the base for making the railways the backbone of the EU’s logistics network (for both passenger and freight) and of its economy at large. Succeeding with this strategy will enable rail to become an essential part of the intermodal, door-to-door services. Still there are remaining issues of the existing unbalanced playing field between rail and other transport modes that need to be resolved in order to benefit fully from the potential of railways.

10:40 - The Future of Rail 2050
Cem Budak, director - European rail leader, ARUP, TURKEY
Megatrends such as rapid urbanisation, population growth, technological advances and climate change have far-reaching implications for the future world in which rail will operate. Beyond these macro forces, changes will also be driven by the evolving needs and expectations of future passengers. Future of Rail 2050 focuses on the passenger experience, and sets out a forward-looking, inspiring vision for rail. The user journeys imagined here are intended to generate a conversation about the world ahead and provide the big picture context for future planning and decision-making by governments and the rail industry. The hope is that the rail industry will move forward with innovation based not solely on past experiences but also on future possibilities and preferred outcomes.

11:10 - Mobility hotspots – innovative design as a railway regeneration enabler
Dominique Laousse, head of innovation and prospective, SNCF, FRANCE
Transportation is global societal disruption initiated by daily uses mutation during the current urban age. Based on new relations to individual times, life spaces and the personal technological bubble, the need for innovation is shifting from transport to mobility. Regenerating the railway focuses on mobility hotspots, with an innovative design challenge to connect all transport modes in a user-friendly/mass-transit-orientated way. Distributed places will help to mix the static and mobile functions of railway and new mobility modes whose pulses could be revealed and managed based on chronotopic analysis to match user expectations, providing renewed urbanity and civility for more sustainable cities.

11:40 - How the 'big 3' technologies shape the future of transportation
Bhoopathi Rapolu, head of analytics, EMEA, Cyient, UK
Internet of Things (IoT), AI and 3D printing are our newfound abilities to shape the future as we want it. Rail transportation is neither indifferent nor aloof to them. They are radically transforming the rail industry in: understanding transportation systems like never before; automating parts of train manufacturing, operations and business decision making; predicting outcomes – passenger response, system failures, part replacements, maintenance plans, financial implications and many more. This session will outline leading ideas, practical methodologies and case studies explaining how the big 3 technologies are shaping the future of rail transportation.

12:10 - Future planning and present problem-solving
Paul Priestman, designer/chairman, PriestmanGoode, UK
While R&D into future modes of transport and the long-term direction of rail is undoubtedly important, we must not lose sight of the fact that our current infrastructure is under huge strain and that we need solutions that we can start to implement now. Paul Priestman, designer, future thinker and chairman of leading global transport design consultancy PriestmanGoode will speak about the challenges the rail industry is facing today, and present two innovative solutions to cope with growing passenger numbers.

12:40 - 14:00 - Lunch

14:00 - Multi-Modal mobility
Jeremy White, head of transport, Seymour Powell, UK
Over hundreds of years, we have developed an infrastructure of rail, road and water ways. These connect our cities and are essential to the future development of our economy. I will explore how an interconnected world of multi modal transport will lead to a seamless passenger experience and how rail will play a key part in this execution. Uncoupled autonomous rail vehicles will provide flexibility for passengers and operators. This will encourage rail travel, increase efficiency while meeting the capacity demands of the future.

14:30 - Railway futures
Dr Roberto Palacin, senior research associate/lead for Rail Systems Group, Newcastle University, UK
The presentation will explore the opportunities that lie ahead for railways as part of a future transport system. These include their potential role as the core mass-transit providers in metropolitan areas using mobility solutions based around the idea of MaaS as well as other opportunities maximising rail's inherent advantages, including energy aspects, connectivity and safety. The audience will also be given a peek at what a future rail system might look like.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - The future of railways is in orchestrating door-to-door journeys
Dr Hans Moonen, management consultant, CGI, NETHERLANDS
The future of railways will be dramatically different. In a world where passengers are always on, cars travel autonomously and transport is increasingly consumed-as-a-service, railways seem to remain traditional companies with a slow pace of innovation. Research confirms that even frequent train travellers mostly appreciate the time aboard the train, but experience the time before and after the train journey as rather stressful. The sector thus has a challenge to remain relevant and attractive in the changing world of mobility. This presentation reveals a (fact-supported) vision for railway operators to develop into mobility orchestrators mastering their clients’ door-to-door journeys.

16:00 - High-speed rail in Central Europe: bottleneck between East and West
Petr Šlegr, project manager, Centre for Efficient Transport, CZECH REPUBLIC
High-speed rail in the Czech Republic has been discussed for more than 10 years, without real progress being made. There is a similar situation in other Central European countries, mainly the post-Communist ones. Without high-speed rail, the public transport in those countries is still not competitive in terms of domestic and international transport. There is a bottleneck between Eastern and Western Europe – some borders still seem to be behind the Iron Curtain. Will TEN-T policy change this situation? What are the major opportunities of HSR in Central Europe?

16:30 - 17:00 - Round Table Discussion
- How can Rail Stay Competitive Against New Mobility Solution Providers and Autonomous Vehicles? Can the Railway Industry Survive the Threat from New Mobility Solutions and What Changes are Required for their Long Term Sustainability? Panelists to be confirmed shortly will include Rail Operators, a Key Rail Institution and a government initiative
Giorgio Travaini, head of research and innovation AI, Shift2Rail, BELGIUM
Dominique Laousse, head of innovation and prospective, SNCF, FRANCE
Dr Mark van Hagen, principal consultant customer experience, NS (Netherlands Railways), NETHERLANDS
Christian Wolmar, award winning writer and broadcaster specialising in transport, Christian Wolmar, UK
Nick Brooks, head of EU affairs, Trainline, FRANCE


Moderator:
Libor Lochman, executive director, CER - The Voice of European Railways

Day 2

Thursday 6 July

THE CHALLENGE FOR RAIL
Meeting Room 5

Moderator
Joan Amorós, president, Ferrmed, ASBL, BELGIUM

09:00 - Digital railways: the backbone of the mobility of tomorrow
Francis Bedel, chief digital officer, International Union of Railways, FRANCE
UIC is a technical platform, at the service of its members around the world. It is committed to pragmatic solutions that bring added value to the railway sector and industry. Last year, UIC decided to create a digital platform that aims to share creative ideas, ensure harmonisation, support new developments and boost innovation. It has identified three main areas of potential interest: security (in particular the crucial issue of cybersecurity, in which UIC is very involved), services and productivity.

09:30 - Smart-Rail – supply chain orientation of the rail freight sector
Ming Chen, senior consultant/project manager, TNO, NETHERLANDS
The current European rail freight market is a complex system involving a great number of different public and private stakeholders, who jointly manage the rail operation. In this situation, the improvements required to become more user orientated always require cooperation between several stakeholders. Smart-Rail is developing new business models facilitated by data/information exchange, which make improvements in the short term possible. Improvement of data exchange is also the start of a transition towards full automation of railways. This automated system should remove the need for bureaucracy and cooperation and will turn this 'machine organisation' into an 'organic organisation' (Mintzberg).

10:00 - Train service of the future – give customers what they want
Dr Mark van Hagen, principal consultant customer experience, NS (Netherlands Railways), NETHERLANDS
Joost van der Made, head of concept design and innovation, NS Rail, NETHERLANDS
Train operating companies (TOC) are keen to attract new customers. The way to be successful is high performance and making customers happy. As part of its strategy, at NS (Dutch Railways) the customer comes first and passenger satisfaction is now the number one target and performance indicator. NS supports this ambition with a wealth of insights into the drivers of passenger satisfaction. The key challenge is how to successfully convert these insights into action; meaningful innovation that drives successful business.

10:30 - 11:00 - Break

11:00 - The risks for an expanding railway
Christian Wolmar, award winning writer and broadcaster specialising in transport, Christian Wolmar, UK
On the face of it, rail has a bright future, with expansion being envisaged across the world. New metro lines in urban areas, high-speed lines linking towns and mineral railways are all being built across the world. However, rail faces a big challenge in competing with new forms of transport, adopting technology that will keep costs down and responding to safety concerns. The big challenge for rail is how to keep growing while still offering value for money.

11:30 - The unknown unknowns of future passenger journeys
Martin Darbyshire, CEO, Tangerine, UK
Unlocking innovation through a designer’s insight into the human behaviours of today, to create future experiences that meet the unmet desires of tomorrow. With almost three decades’ experience creating paradigm-shifting products, services and experiences for global brands such as British Airways, LG and Toyota, Martin provides a thoughtful snapshot of how design can create transport solutions with exceptional customer experiences that meet the unimagined future needs of passengers and providers.

12:00 - AeroLiner3000 – the capacity booster for British railways
Andreas Vogler, director, Andreas Vogler Studio, GERMANY
A train, which looks as if the future has already begun: AeroLiner3000. When aerospace designers (Andreas Vogler Studio) and aerospace engineers (German Aerospace Center) explore the future of rail travel, the outcome is low-carbon and light-weight. The train is so light, that it stabilizes with nose wings against flying out of the tracks. The propulsion system is the finest of mechatronics, making the train barely touch the rails. AeroLiner3000 is showing the potential of a realistic future of train travel.

12:30 - Railway as the mobility backbone of the future
Dr Kurt Fuchs, attorney, www.eisenbahnrecht.com, GERMANY
Railways are fast and capable of transporting many people or goods at the same time with little demand in terms of space and energy compared with other traffic carriers. They can form the ecological backbone for future travel and transportation. In metropolitan areas, railway-based public transport will be the only possibility to satisfy the increasing rush-hour traffic. For the railways to meet future requirements, we need silent and convenient vehicles and a massive extension of the railway network. However, long and complex planning processes hamper the necessary network extension. Therefore, new regulations on planning procedures are needed.

13:00 - 14:00 - Lunch

Moderator
James Nix, director, Freight and Climate, Transport & Environment, BELGIUM

14:00 - Next generation train for future intermodal transport
Dr Joachim Winter, senior scientist, Institute of Vehicle Concepts, German Aerospace Center (DLR), GERMANY
Worldwide there is a tendency that already large cities are growing to become mega cities. To manage a city of this size requires the use of digitalisation to make it smart. Thus a network of people and things will be able to rapidly exchange information by means of modern telecommunication and informatics capabilities. This can be used to enhance the traffic in smart cities by providing more mobility for many more people with less traffic. The electrification of cars will not mean the end of traffic jams – but car sharing and improved public transport will. In the same sense transport between smart cities over long distances will require fast, comfortable trains and well organised hub stations to handle the masses of people with short dwell times.

14:30 - Rail AGVs to transform rail into a container distribution network
Paul Van Bers, innovation manager and strategic B2B consultant, BersCo Consultancy, NETHERLANDS
Trains are suitable for bulk transportation, preferably on fixed lines. Train transportation of containers requires the forwarder to adapt to the train operator. Container and train are basically a mismatch, and the market share is only 10%. For container transportation, the train is a niche player, stuck in the middle between truck and barge. With the rail AGV concept, in which the optimal length is one intelligent self-propelled wagon, rail is again able to compete with trucks in the areas of flexibility, reaction time, service speed, availability, costs and individual service. This will be illuminated.

15:00 - 15:30 - Break

15:30 - Smart, competitive cooperation – the future of rail systems
Miroslav Haltuf, independent consultant, H-Comp Consulting, CZECH REPUBLIC
The paper will deal with the new position of railway systems under the influence of the 4th Railway package, full liberalisation of railway operation and competition from the road and air industries. New technologies based on digitalisation, big data and IoT, along with innovation and research activities related to customer satisfaction, are the stimulators for rail's new role and position. Making the railway smart and ready for cooperation with other modes of transport is the only chance to keep it alive and ready for further development.

16:00 - Rail's three genetic technologies futureproof freight and passenger positioning
Dr David van der Meulen, managing member, Railway Corporate Strategy Close Corporation, SOUTH AFRICA
Distinguishing rail from all other modes, Supporting carries heavy loads by double-decking and double-stacking; Guiding supports high-speed with generous vehicle profiles; Coupling can reduce average headways. New transport forms cannot pretend to these domains, offering instead on-demand, customised, personalised service, using autonomous single vehicles. They require shorter headway, which increases the significance of dwell time, ultimately to demand parallel or off-line boarding and alighting, rather than serial like rail, which compounds system complexity. Small vehicles destroy fixed guideway capacity, but autonomous transport forms could wonderfully complement and expand rail's freight and passenger appeal in relation to logistics parks and lifestyle mobility.


One-hundred-and-eighty years on from Stephenson’s Rocket, what will be the greatest challenges faced by rail operators in the future? Passenger numbers and demand continue to rise, but how can rail operators meet the increasing demand and where will investment come from to support network improvements? Tony Robinson, the founder of one of the world’s largest transportation industry publishing and event companies, will pose the question and ask participants to examine how the rail industry can survive the challenge from new transport forms including high-speed (platooning) autonomous vehicles and PATS for personal mobility. Indeed, can rail meet the challenge long term in the freight sector? Leading rail operators in Europe and elsewhere will be asked to put forward their cases and their visions for the future of rail.

Just some of the topics discussed in this stream will include:

  • Railway industry forecasts - 2030 and beyond
  • Challenges and opportunities for rail
  • Competition from new or evolving modes of personal mobility
  • Funding railways of the future
  • Long-term financial stability in the rail industry
  • Distributive technologies
  • Improving passenger satisfaction
  • Environmental performance of railway
  • Supporting growth in the freight sector
  • Trans-European Transport Networks