19 - 20 June 2018
Köln Messe, Cologne, Germany

All Streams are across 2 days

Where will the investment for the future of transport come from? What business opportunities will new mobility solutions create? What impact will they have on jobs? The Future of Transportation World Conference will discuss and investigate how disruptive technologies will affect the thousands of people employed throughout various transportation networks, and what new opportunities they could create.

How will current infrastructure cope with new disruptive technology, and is it ready for mass adoption of highly connected autonomous vehicles? Future infrastructure projects will also need to be proactive in their design to incorporate new emerging technology and connectivity. Smart cities and transportation networks will need to become smart-grid networks connecting road, rail, metro, public transport and new urban mobility solutions. In this stream we will discuss challenges for infrastructure in the future, from both a technical, and an economic perspective, and what role infrastructure projects will play in society and in creating more efficient, sustainable, long-term transportation solutions for the future.

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Conference Programme



Day 1: Tuesday 19 June

Conference Room 5 - Level 2 Planning, Investment, & Policies to Support The Future of Transportation Infrastructure

Moderator

Amir Nayeri
Deputy director - infrastructure development
Meridiam
FRANCE

09:25

Governance innovation for transport infrastructure

Torsten Klimke
Deputy head of unit, Directorate General for Mobility and Transport
European Commission
BELGIUM
Breakthroughs in transport infrastructure are needed to cope with the technological development of vehicles, new forms of communication and the need to reduce environmental impact and use of natural resources. Infrastructures should allow smooth introduction and functioning of innovative vehicles and mobility patterns for the benefit of customers and society. Public administrations and private companies can provide the necessary framework to facilitate the seamless implementation of innovation, together and/or in partnership or separately.

09:50

Capturing value from station-related development and regeneration to finance front-loaded infrastructure costs – case studies

John McNulty
Infrastructure programme director HS2 Growth Partnership
LCR
UK
LCR (London & Continental Railways Ltd) has delivered pioneering station developments and regeneration at the stations on the High Speed 1 (HS1) railway it delivered for UK’s DfT – in particular St Pancras/King's Cross Central and Stratford. As well as maximising the economic benefits from the high-speed rail investment, it has created and captured great value from these major developments, which are retained by the public sector to offset infrastructure costs. LCR is now supporting cities on the High Speed 2 (HS2) and Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR) routes, in defining and delivering major station development and regeneration programmes at the high-speed stations. You will see how these programmes are building on HS1 successes to maximise benefits from efficient rail hubs, high-quality development and retail, public realm and place-making, and also long-term value capture to finance front-loaded infrastructure costs.

10:15

Development and financing of the railway infrastructure in Germany

Marco Wilfert
Head of special investment programmes
Deutsche Bahn Netz AG
GERMANY
To manage the predicted growth of railway traffic volume and to increase the capacity and quality of its railway network, DB Netz had to develop a long-term investment strategy that contained the realisation of new lines, enhancement and renewal projects in accordance with the transport policy objectives of the German Federal Government. In the past decade, several new financing instruments have been developed and introduced to enable DB Netz to implement these strategies. Furthermore, the Federal Government initiated a substantial increase in subsidies for railway infrastructure projects. Due to these elementary changes, the number of railway infrastructure projects increased considerably.

10:40 - 11:20

Break

11:20

Building sustainable infrastructure though urban integration and capturing value

Peter Morley
Principal
Hassell
HONG KONG
Most major cities around the world are investing in railway metro systems. In Asia the pace of change is astonishing (Shenzhen will have a metro network more than twice the size of London's by 2030). But just building the lines is not enough to make them viable and sustainable. Using case studies from Hong Kong, Shenzhen, London and Sydney, a case is made for the benefits of network and station planning for urban integration that can support superdensity and a car-free, public transport-orientated lifestyle for the communities they serve.

11:45

The role of INEA in supporting transport research, innovation and deployment including infrastructure, smart grids and smart cities

Alan Haigh
Head of department, Horizon 2020 Energy and Transport, INEA Executive Agency
European Commission
BELGIUM
Carlo Coppola
Project manager - Innovation and Networks Executive Agency (INEA)
European Commission
BELGIUM
The European Commission's Innovation and Networks Executive Agency, INEA, supports various research, innovation and deployment programmes with an operational budget in excess of €34bn, most notably the Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation programme (H2020) and the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF). An overview of the role of the agency will be presented and details of each funding programme elaborated. The H2020 programme supports research and new technology development in many transport modes and also supports innovation and pilot and demonstration project deployment. An overview of past and future funding opportunities will be given, as well as example projects such as automated road transport, aviation, innovative infrastructure and developing intermodal technologies. The CEF programme supports a wide variety of actions including rail infrastructure and management systems, intelligent transport systems and flagship cross-border infrastructure projects. Funding opportunities and innovative technologies will be highlighted as well as examples in various transport modes. Speakers from both programmes will be available for further information at the conference.

12:25

Is the 'new-era transportation infrastructure' ready for private investment?

Reiner Schrankler
Partner and member iCON investment committee
iCON Infrastructure
GERMANY
Who are the investors (from private equity to pension funds to dedicated infrastructure funds)? What are their economic investment requirements (deal volumes, holding period, return and yield objectives)? What is their risk appetite? Where can the project cash flow come from to satisfy investors’ needs? What are the relevant 'new-era infrastructure' subsectors for investors? This presentation will deal mainly with e-mobility, including whether e-mobility infrastructure can be financed by investors, and the obstacles for private investors to invest in new-era transportation infrastructure. The session will describe and explain how private investors like iCON Infrastructure work, and what needs to happen to get such investors involved in funding new-era infrastructure.

12:50 - 13:50

Lunch

Moderator

Peter Morley
Principal
Hassell
HONG KONG

13:50

The value of infrastructure and its influence on project planning

Aernout van der Bend
Director general
NGInfra (Next Generation Infrastructures)
NETHERLANDS
Infrastructure is more than adding lines to our networks. It’s about the service we can offer on the networks. In the Netherlands we’ve surveyed the value of infrastructure (12% of the GNP; but what’s that?) Mostly that’s expressed in euros. More interesting is to change the focus to infrastructure's societal benefits: climate change, inclusion, labour and happiness. Therefor it’s about adding value not only to your own network but specifically also cross-sectoral to the other networks (roads, waterways, railways, main ports, power and gas, etc.) and to society.

14:15

Why 'smart' infrastructure investment, now?

Sayeh Ghanbari
Partner, infrastructure and transport advisory
EY
UK
By 2050 more than two-thirds of the world’s population will live in urban areas, which will put pressure on existing infrastructure and city finances. At the same time, cities need new solutions to infrastructure investment models and service delivery to keep pace with growing demand and ageing existing infrastructure. The time is ripe for new 'smart' infrastructure investment. Resilience: cities need to build infrastructure that is resilient to shocks and stresses, as this has the potential to bring long-term economic, social and physical benefits. Alternative financing models: smart technologies increasingly shape the way infrastructure is designed, built, operated and owned, so how can cities secure investments when that infrastructure increasingly integrates smart technologies?

14:40

Digital technology: a catalyser or a hurdle for securing funding?

Boris Galonske
Managing director
Silverbergh Partners
SWITZERLAND
Transportation 4.0 is starting to take shape. The integration of digital technologies into transportation assets is accelerating. New digital business models are evolving. Successes and setbacks can be perceived. What does this mean for funding? What are the challenges and where are the opportunities? Addressing the needs of investors, operators and customers will be key to matching capital supply with investment opportunities. New investment opportunities can also be identified. The session will shed some light on digital value levers from a funding perspective. The status quo, potential opportunities and approaches to deal with the evolution of technology will be discussed.

15:05 - 15:45

Break

15:45

Suburban co-working – a mobility solution

Alexander Mereu
New mobility advisor
IBI Group
CANADA
In a future that seems more uncertain than ever, innovative mobility solutions that are quick to implement, resilient and low risk should be top investment priorities. The shared office (or co-working) has been on the rise in recent years and is expected to continue its rapid growth into the future. Viewing co-working as a transportation solution could provide the answers to many of our biggest mobility challenges. A network of suburban co-working centres could deliver the same types of benefits as transportation infrastructure, but at a fraction of the cost, with less disruption and with a much shorter implementation timeline.

16:10

'City as a Service' – where mobility and urban planning meet

Christian Gärtner
CEO and founder
Urban Standards GmbH
GERMANY
Technological advancement and urban growth offer unprecedented opportunities for city dwellers to advance urban living. Digital communication empowers the individual and changes the overall business framework. Data processing capabilities turn infrastructure into on-demand services. Densification increases social interactions and transactions exponentially and along the demand for mobility. However, pressure on land use and resources threatens the social bond within societies. Balancing the interests in a multi-stakeholder marketplace is key to a city that serves its inhabitants and constituencies. Planning for mobility means dealing with the evolving ?infrastructure of our communities, economic and regulatory frameworks and, consequently, of our cities.

16:35 - 17:10

Panel Discussion

What challenges face the transportation infrastructure industry over the next decade? Strategies to minimise risk and maximise new opportunities.

Moderator:

Peter Morley
Principal
Hassell
HONG KONG

Panelists:

Torsten Klimke
Deputy head of unit, Directorate General for Mobility and Transport
European Commission
BELGIUM
Thomas Tannheimer
Network planning and portfolio management
Deutsche Bahn Netz AG
GERMANY
Aernout van der Bend
Director general
NGInfra (Next Generation Infrastructures)
NETHERLANDS
John D'Arcy
Transportation development director
Mott MacDonald
UK
Please Note: This conference programme may be subject to change