December 10 & 11, 2019
Messe Wien Exhibition & Congress Center, Vienna, Austria

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Conference Program



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Stream 1: Urban & Inter-urban eVTOL Air Mobility

The electric VTOL revolution – a 2019 update

Mike Hirschberg
Executive director
Vertical Flight Society
USA
Over the past five years there has been a groundswell of interest in electric- and hybrid electric-powered vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft for personal air vehicles, urban air taxis and even military missions. Electric VTOL obviates the need for mechanical power transmission, allowing new aircraft design freedom through approaches such as distributed electric propulsion. More than 65 electric VTOL designs are being developed today, with many now in advanced stages of flight testing. This presentation will detail the status of the electric VTOL revolution to date, and analyze trends for the future.

Short-term needs for unmanned traffic management

Dr Isabel Del Pozo De Poza
Head of UTM
Airbus UTM
USA
The presentation will discuss five-year activities, requirements and plans for cities looking to reap the benefits of unmanned vehicles (from air taxis to delivery drones). How can these aircraft safely share the skies, what does the future of ATM look like, and what steps can be taken today?

Urban air mobility revolution with ASX

Dr Anita Sengupta
Chief product officer/co-founder
Airspace Experience Technologies (ASX)
USA
Dr Sengupta will present how space-age tech coupled with the VC-funded innovation environment is enabling a revolution in sustainable aviation. She will review how autonomous VTOL air taxis are an enabling technology for urban transport in the smart cities of the future. She will also discuss the design and testing of the Mobi-One, an electric tilt-wing VTOL aircraft being developed at her new company, Airspace Experience Technologies (ASX). From the utilization of airspace, to infrastructure, to air traffic control, she will present on the urban air mobility revolution coming to a city near you.

Break

Air taxis – closer than you think

Christian Bauer
Head of business development
Volocopter GmbH
GERMANY
Air taxis are closer than you think. Current transportation systems in mega-cities are reaching their limits due to growing populations. The logical response is to offer solutions in the third dimension: autonomous flying air-taxi operations. Receiving the commercial license for air taxi aircraft is a question of time, not possibility. Volocopter is focusing on shaping the necessary ecosystem around UAM, including air traffic management, city regulation and the take-off and landing infrastructure.

Vertiport operations – ‘It’s airport operations Jim, but not as you know it’

Darrell Swanson
Director
Swanson Aviation Consultancy
UK
Commercial vertiports will be unique facilities requiring a different approach to operating than that of current airports. The high passenger turnover and variable capacity of eVTOL require specialized facilities and modes of operation not observed in the commercial aviation community. This paper will explore some of the challenges that future vertiport operators will need to address to ensure successful commercial operation.

Urban air mobility will change the world

André Homulenko
Senior project manager - strategic foresight
SBB New Mobility Services
SWITZERLAND
Dr Stephan Baur
Senior project manager
Roland Berger GmbH
GERMANY
One hundred thousand passenger drones could be in service by 2050. Driven by increasing urbanization and road congestion, and advances in technology such as electrical propulsion, we are living through the rise of the UAM industry, with opportunities but also challenges for established and new players. Key challenges include securing funding until the commercial market for UAM gets to a relevant size, identifying the correct aircraft design for relevant use cases, and developing ground infrastructure to support UAM, among many others. The industry is set to revolutionize urban transport – but how will the industry evolve while ensuring safe, affordable and efficient transport?

Lunch

10x safer than general aviation – challenges and the way past them

Balazs Kerulo
Chief engineer
LIFT Aircraft
USA
LIFT Aircraft's vision is to bring the thrill and joy of personal flight to everyone, in a way that improves flight safety statistics by one order of magnitude compared with legacy general aviation aircraft and procedures. Given that we aim to achieve this by paradigm-changing aircraft technologies flown by potentially inexperienced people holding no pilot's license, the question of 'how' is the first that pops up. We believe it is entirely possible, but it will take a holistic approach that addresses technical, procedural and social aspects. In our speech, we will introduce the most crucial milestones toward proving the concept; the ones achieved as well as the ones still ahead.

The current challenges and limitations of selling eVTOL flight experience

Peter Molnar
CEO
Maform
HUNGARY
Due to the limitations of current battery technologies and the lack of infrastructure, eVTOLs can hardly be the transportation solution for the near future. This paper shows how good design practice can support bridging the gap between the current limitations and the future where eVTOLs are profitable to operate as a means of transportation. Through the example of Lift's Hexa aircraft design development, the paper describes the challenges and solutions of selling flight experience using current technological and infrastructural limitations. It contains case studies about developing user experience, graphical user interfaces and industrial design of an eVTOL aircraft designed for earliest market entry.

Hybrid hydrogen energy conversion system for electric flight

Josef Kallo
Institute director
University of Ulm
GERMANY
Electrochemical energy conversion systems based on batteries and hydrogen fuel cells have made tremendous progress in the last five years as an energy source for electric propulsion in aircraft applications. This presentation will provide an update on our validated work for a passenger aircraft (HY4) propulsion unit, including fuel cell load data discussion on critical operating conditions.

Break

Preparing cities for urban air mobility

Simon Whalley
Regulatory and policy manager
Skyports Limited
UK
Vertiport infrastructure will play a key role in the realization of UAM services. Skyports is the first organization to focus on delivering vertiports, securing passenger and cargo vertiports in congested cities worldwide. In October, Skyports – with Volocopter – will be showcasing the world’s first full-scale vertiport with flights in Singapore. Governments, city authorities, transport agencies and aviation authorities can engage with Skyports to be early adopters of this technology, and maximize the socio-economic and environmental benefits of UAM. This presentation provides an indicative roadmap for public authorities and industry partners, to enable the expansion of vertiports and UAM services.

The future of vertical mobility

Gregor Grandl
Senior partner
Porsche Consulting GmbH
GERMANY
In this presentation, using data from the first published market figures, we will discuss several key points surrounding the eVTOL mobility system. This will include sizing the market until 2035, predicting when vertical mobility will be a reality, as well as how fast the market will evolve and possible scenarios. The presentation will also discuss who has a right to win and who will lose.

Urban air mobility – needs and requirements of the third dimension

Piia Karjalainen
Senior manager
MaaS Alliance
BELGIUM
The session will sketch an exciting picture of our future urban and suburban mobility. The main goal of this session is to support cities and regulators in preparing their responses and actions regarding these emerging, prominent services. The session also aims to show how drones will contribute toward integrating local communities and urban areas, enhancing the mobility network and answering real urban needs. Last-mile transport, passenger mobility, emergency use cases and traffic management will all be discussed, as well as issues on the governance of drone operations in the urban environment.

Review of urban air mobility projects and propulsion systems

Robert Vergnes
President
Neva Aerospace
UK
This presentation will discuss the Phase 1 EU-funded Apollo project, which has reviewed more than 30 UAM projects worldwide. It will also review the propulsion system choices and the advances in electric turbines for distributed propulsion systems (UAM).

The opportunities of hybrid electric propulsion and the impact on designing the passenger experience

José Rui Marcelino
CEO and design manager
Almadesign
PORTUGAL
The Flexcraft project combines the expertise of a consortium of companies/institutions (Almadesign, IST, SET, Embraer, Inegi) in the fields of industrial design, aeronautical/process engineering and aircraft manufacturing, to develop an on-demand urban air transportation solution. This presentation outlines the opportunities of hybrid electric propulsion and the impact on designing the passenger experience via innovative cabin layouts and modular fuselage configurations. The solution will be tested using a remotely operated scaled demonstrator, a full-size cabin mock-up and an innovative manufacturing process, bringing new opportunities for flying multimodal vehicles that promise considerable advantages in low-level urban airspaces, specifically related to noise, emissions, flexibility and operating cost.

Break

The opportunity of urban electric aircraft transportation

Martin Warner
Chairman
Autonomous Flight
UK
The presentation will discuss the opportunity provided by urban electric aircraft transportation, and will cover and make the case for eVTOL aircraft solutions for major cities, including the benefits of this transformation. It will explain how this space will evolve, the economics required, the current regulatory challenges and likely solutions ahead, including air traffic integration. It will also highlight the private and commercial use opportunities, including the industry innovation present today, and where it will likely be in the five- and ten-year horizons. The session will conclude with Autonomous Flight’s role in creating a city-based air transportation system.

Key test challenges for electric propulsion, flight connectivity and autonomous air mobility

Tobias Willuhn
Head of program management, Aerospace and Defense
Rohde & Schwarz
GERMANY
Urban air mobility (UAM) – mobility in the third dimension – is shaping the future of aerospace. In the race to bring eVTOL concepts to global markets and provide safe, secure and sustainable mobility services, aerospace designers and engineers are looking to many different technologies to address the associated challenges. From electrically powered propulsion to automated/autonomous flight, the realization of the UAM vision depends on the seamless integration of various technologies. We will provide unique insight, share best practices and discuss current challenges for testing and validating of key enabler technologies such as sensors (radar), wireless communication (4G, 5G, SatCom), flight navigation (GNSS) and the overall electronic system performance (EMI, EMC).

Can AI pass the exam for human pilots?

David Haber
head of deep learning
Daedalean
SWITZERLAND
How feasible is the urban air mobility that everyone is talking about? It depends on how close we are to fully autonomous flight: not only is there a shortage of pilots for the future air taxi industry, but the human brain has not evolved for flying within heavy air traffic. So, the key enabler for the industry to come is autonomy. But it must be built to the highest standards of safety, and be more reliable than a human pilot. The talk describes the key steps and challenges on the way to achieving full autonomy.

Electrical propulsion - how will the aerospace giants adapt?

Nikhil Sachdeva
Senior consultant
Roland Berger
UK
The discovery of energy-dense crude oil and the invention of the jet engine enabled the globalization of aviation, making it fast, cheap and accessible to all. However, with the electrification of the automotive industry, new technologies have emerged, and aerospace may be the next to electrify. The rise of electrical propulsion will likely change the industry: giants from Airbus and Boeing to Rolls-Royce and General Electric will jostle for supremacy and may lose ground to new entrants. The trend spells a cleaner and potentially safer future for aviation – but how will companies adapt?

Lunch

Airborne artificial intelligence – easy, hard or impossible?

Dr Stephen Wright
Associate professor of Aerospace Engineering
University of the West of England
UK
Automatic stabilization of eVTOL aerial vehicles is well understood and implemented, and attention is now switching to the next level of pilot automation: navigation and flight management. This new challenge can, and perhaps must, be achieved by a variety of artificial intelligence and machine learning techniques, but how to make them flight-worthy? This talk will address a number of questions posed by the proposed use of airborne AI: How is putting artificial intelligence into aerial vehicles useful? What are the challenges of doing this? What are the potential solutions? Can these solutions be realized?

UAM from the regulator's point of view

Markus Farner
Co-leader innovation and digitization
Federal Office for Civil Aviation FOCA
SWITZERLAND
We are increasingly receiving information about new projects concerning UAM that are about to break through. Today, there is still an opportunity to counteract the polarization – not only by the media – with a transparent discussion about UAM based on facts and requirements. In a globalized world, this is becoming more and more demanding, as rules are increasingly developed by international bodies, which often also have to take into account different political and economic goals. Nevertheless, it is still possible to create functioning systems through intelligent cooperation at the national level that can serve as an international role model.

Preparing airport systems for integrated urban air mobility and connected and autonomous vehicle systems

Derrick Choi
Aviation and transportation leader
Gensler
USA
Over the last five years, the collaboration between airports, CAVs and eVTOL operators has truly begun to take flight. What was once an abstract conversation about the future of mobility has quickly accelerated into a complex negotiation of interweaving, evolving business models, regulatory frameworks and regional infrastructural realities. This presentation synthesizes the current developments in getting current airport systems – both in the metropolitan and regional context – prepared for the integrated future of integrated urban air mobility (UAM) and CAV systems, and posits a few urban and regional development scenarios to contemplate for next-generation global aviation systems.

Break

Application of manned multicopters in emergency medical situations

Denis Benk
Strategy and finance projects
ADAC Luftrettung GmbH
GERMANY
The presentation will discuss ways to optimize emergency medical situations (EMS) systems by transporting medical staff via multicopters instead of road-going emergency vehicles. It will focus on EMS tactics, technological requirements, regulations, flight and operations safety and staff. The preliminary results of a feasibility study on model regions will be presented. ADAC Luftrettung's project partners are Volocopter, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt and the University of Munich.

Energy: the Achilles’ heel of urban air mobility? UAM energy recharging needs and system sizing

Paola Arellano
Head of the architectural department
Systra
FRANCE
Urban air mobility will probably see the light of day in the coming years as many companies are racing to develop the required technology. However, although the technology seems almost there, one of the biggest challenges is dealing with the energy requirements. Energy recharging for UAM will dictate the requirements for the infrastructure. Our capacity to integrate these energy systems and infrastructures in cities will be the key to enabling a real mode of mobility. This presentation will focus on the links between these needs and the system sizing, whether that be capacity, fleet or infrastructure.

European Roadmap “Smart Systems for Urban Air Mobility”

Dr Gereon Meyer
Deputy Head of Department Future Mobility and Europe
VDI/VDE Innovation + Technik GmbH
GERMANY
Urban air mobility is promising a number of relevant use cases in passenger transport, logistics and services. In view of the important role that sensors, actuators and intelligent controls play as enabling technologies for disruptive concepts and applications of “drones”, the European Technology Platform on Smart Systems Integration (EPoSS) is editing a “European Roadmap Smart Systems for Urban Air Mobility”. This talk is summarizing the work by showing technical, socio-economical and legal hurdles, identifying research needs and highlighting technology transfer options. Issues of public acceptance and transportation planning related to urban air mobility are covered as well.

Stream 2: Mass Deployment of Autonomous Vehicles

Avoiding compliance scandals in the era of Level 5 mass deployment

Alex Geisler
Partner, transportation and automotive industry team lead
Duane Morris
UK
In recent times, all the woes and scandals of the automobile industry have arisen from error states in two areas: safety compliance and product compliance. This won't change with mass autonomy, but the trouble spots will be even harder to identify. This glimpse of the future will give OEMs and Tier 1 suppliers an early sight of the challenges, and will address some of the key steps that could be taken today to avoid these future pitfalls.

The software update trap – unlimited updates = endless liability?

Dr Philipp Egler
Counsel
Bird & Bird LLP
GERMANY
This presentation will address the underlying contractual relationships with the consumer / customer /supplier as well as tort law and product liability. It will also address specific difficulties that arise from a delay of roll-out of software updates between various suppliers. Software products often require constant updates, either to patch gaps in the security structure or to increase improve customer experience. Novel questions arise as to how those constant software updates impact liability and warranty periods. Finally, the presentation will focus on recent developments regarding a possible reform of the European Product Liability Directive and its suitability for the challenges of connected and autonomous driving.

Key changes to the AV regulatory framework and their effect on AV developments in France and the EU

Claude-Etienne Armingaud
Partner
K&L Gates
FRANCE
On March 29, 2018, French President Emmanuel Macron announced his plan to turn France into a global leader in AI. This political leadership was subsequently translated into the Villani report on AI, highlighting autonomous vehicle (AV) as a regulatory case study, and the Idrac report on AV. Following these reports, the regulatory framework is currently being amended. This presentation will outline the key changes and how they will affect AV developments in France and in the EU.

Break

Liability in a Level 5 world

Katherine Sheriff
Knowledge manager, automotive and mobility industry sector group
Hogan Lovells
USA
What would criminal, contract and tort liability look like in a world with Level 5 autonomous vehicles dominating transit? The benefits and potential consequences of Level 5 saturation will be discussed. Additionally, the likely legal framework for criminal, contract and tort law will be outlined.

Some prophecy: the law at Level 5

Alex Glassbrook
Barrister
Temple Garden Chambers
UK
Alex Glassbrook, British barrister and author, examines the legal future of Level 5 vehicles and speculates as to the law and the nature of legal procedures beyond the Automated and Electric Vehicles Act 2018.

Understanding future insurance law challenges for connected and autonomous vehicles

Dr Matthew Channon
Lecturer in Law
University of Exeter
UK
This presentation will discuss some of the insurance law challenges that will be faced in the future for connected and autonomous vehicles. The UK has introduced the Automated and Electric Vehicles Act 2018, although there are more insurance challenges in the future. This presentation will discuss some of the insurance law challenges across a number of jurisdictions.

Lunch

Current legal issues in the context of autonomous driving

Hans Steege
Dipl.-Jur.
Leibniz University Hannover
GERMANY
Autonomous driving raises numerous legal questions that result from the increase in automation as well as from the fact that vehicles can drive without passengers. Due to the missing human driver, there is no possibility of intervention, and various legal aspects must be taken into account. Increasing digitization, connectivity with the environment, data collection and storage lead to further questions. The presentation provides an overview of current legal issues relating to autonomous driving: civil liability, programming, dilemma situations, data protection (GDPR), telecommunication law, police controls, and prohibition of Level 1-4 vehicles.

Autonomous vehicles: regulating for better disruption of mobility

Stéphanie Priou
Managing director
Ubiquity Consulting
SPAIN
Although AVs are increasingly seen on our roads, few regulations exist to pave the way for this disruptive technology. Existing laws should therefore be used as examples to support the development of adequate regulatory frameworks worldwide, supporting AV take-up while informing and protecting citizens.

Future autonomous vehicle technologies: insights from patent filings

Dr Paul Loustalan
Patent attorney - partner
Reddie & Grose LLP
UK
Significant investment has been and is being made in the development of autonomous vehicles, and with that comes a desire to protect that investment by way of patents. As such, patent filings provide a good insight into where R&D is being carried out, and therefore into potential future technologies. We will look into the patent filing trends of the incumbent OEMs, but also of the disruptors emerging quickly into the sector from other markets. What will the core technology be, and who might end up with the key patent rights that everyone will need?

Break

Analyzing the impact of autonomous vehicles on motor insurance

Frederic Bruneteau
Managing director
Ptolemus
BELGIUM
Learn what insurers are doing today to prepare for ADAS and automation, and how new safety technologies will affect motor insurance. Explore the impact of ADAS on claims losses and premiums, including country- and region-specific examples, and which insurers are already adjusting premiums to ADAS. Identify which technologies will have the largest impact on insurance and how risk is calculated, plus implications for new policy types and clauses such as cybersecurity. The presentation will also address the liability question, mapping out how liability changes with automation and explaining where different auto makers and suppliers stand.

Is a 'shadow mode' the next step toward driverless cars?

Dr Daniel Pauly
Partner
Linklaters
GERMANY
Maximilian Zahn
Managing associate
Linklaters
GERMANY
This presentation will tackle several important questions concerning ‘shadow mode’ driving in AVs. Which legal implications with regard to the implementation of a 'shadow mode' have to be considered? Who owns the data? Which data is concerned? We will then ask whether OEMs or regional importers need consent. If consent is required, whose consent is it? When is such consent required? We will also discuss the consequences or implications this has with regard to OEMs' documentation (e.g. user manuals).

Improving accessible transportation around the world

Malcom Glenn
Head of global policy, accessibility and underserved communities
Uber
USA
Uber is using technology to make transportation accessible and reliable for users with disabilities. In more than 600 cities across 64 countries on six continents, we’re committed to continuing to build solutions that support everyone’s ability to move around their communities. Our digital features are available everywhere and make the platform easier to use for people who are blind, deaf or have cognitive disabilities. And in major markets on four continents, we’re utilizing innovative models to bring wheelchair-accessible vehicles to our platform. Learn how we’re making accessibility a meaningful part of what we do, and help us along the journey.

Are people ready to adopt connected AV's? A review of six pilot cities

Thomas Møller Thomsen
President, Region 1
FIA
BELGIUM
We are working on a further pillar to our My Car My Data initiative by releasing a study showing that the current models allowing access to vehicle data will potentially entail huge economic costs for European consumers and aftermarket service providers. We are further working on user acceptance of autonomous driving within the ARCADE, AUTOPILOT and L3Pilot projects. Throughout the spring, we will run user acceptance evaluation in six pilot cities in Europe, and measure people's readiness to adopt connected automated driving technology.

The journey to 2030 and the importance of international collaboration

Dr Daniel Ruiz
CEO
Zenzic
UK
The success of future connected and automated mobility (CAM) lies in global collaboration. To accelerate the safe deployment of connected and self-driving vehicles, we need to encourage and enable global collaboration across critical areas of testing and development. Working together delivers incremental value to all stakeholders and improves coordination between leading countries in the drive to a mobile future. The UK Connected and Automated Mobility Roadmap to 2030 details developments from the present day to 2030. It presents a single vision that shows dependencies, focuses on investment and articulates the path to scaling capabilities and technologies globally. Greater alignment between countries in areas where it makes no sense to compete will enable the benefits of CAM to be realized at scale more quickly.

Break

Key ADAS features, benefits and concerns in the race to automation

Eric Meloche
Crash avoidance research engineer
Transport Canada
CANADA
Although there is little to no doubt that full automation will ultimately be a reality, we must ensure that its deployment occurs in a safe and responsible way. From a regulator’s perspective, safety should always remain the paramount priority. As ADAS are leading the way and becoming the norm, we should also ensure that marketing does not mislead consumers and that the various systems’ limitations are communicated clearly. The results of an in-depth, all-season analysis of key ADAS features from 45 commercial systems will be presented, and the main safety benefits and concerns associated with partial automation will be discussed.

Vehicle automation vs vehicle autonomy – driving forces and technological impact

Dr Michael Lipka
Senior manager
Huawei Technologies Düsseldorf GmbH
GERMANY
Controlling vehicle autonomy via an onboard computing and sensing environment, particularly in complex traffic situations, is expected to fail in the short term due to the shortcomings of AI and power demand. In turn, automated networking vehicle fleets for shared mobility can go hand in hand with smart city, smart road and smart infrastructure developments starting in geofenced areas. Balanced end-to-end system partitioning, which integrates vehicle, roadside units, edge and cloud, will achieve safe and economic operation of automated vehicles by deterministic methods. In contrast, the full autonomous approach for single vehicles will be challenged by the huge demand for anticipating critical traffic situations.

Practical implications of steward-less autonomous vehicles in commercial operation

Tom Jansen
Global domain leader connected and automated vehicles
Ricardo PLC
NETHERLANDS
We are seeing the deployment of many 'novel' pilots with self-driving vehicles around the world. Looking more closely, we see that often these vehicles feature a steward or safety driver on board who in fact is legally in control of the vehicle at all times. With new legislation slowly allowing testing without stewards on board, it is essential that we understand the practical implications for autonomous vehicles operating without safety drivers. In this session we will explain the implications for CAV design and testing from our practical experience working with industry leaders in recent (truly driverless) CAV projects.

The @CITY project – automated cars and intelligent traffic in the city

Prasant Narula
Engineering group manager - automated driving
Aptiv Services Deutschland GmbH
GERMANY
@CITY aims to generate a new, automated driving experience for safe, stress-free, efficient and comfortable driving in the city. In the @CITY project, the research partners strive to understand the challenges of urban automated driving and generate added value not only for the driver, but also for other road users. The ultimate goal of @CITY is to implement automated driving functions in experimental vehicles and to test them under realistic conditions of highly dense and complicated urban scenarios. The presentation will include the objectives, project structure, partners involved and their technical approaches, including initial results from the project.

Lunch

Shared driverless vehicles – when and how?

Harri Santamala
CEO
Sensible 4
FINLAND
We have all been reading in the news about various robotaxi, shuttle bus and fully autonomous vehicle developments, pilots and hype. This presentation covers the vision, the expectations and the current reality of autonomous driving from a critical perspective. As pilots and demos are underway in several countries, it is appropriate to ask when they will really be part of our everyday mobility. This presentation will offer a perspective on this vision and how it connects with technology development, as well as practical experiences that take into account the wider context and a vision of the future of road transportation.

The missing link in autonomous vehicle tech

Chris Heiser
Co-founder and CEO
Renovo Auto
USA
Today’s autonomous vehicles generate massive quantities of data from the cameras, lidars and other sensors that keep them operating safely (one autonomous vehicle creates >4TB every hour). Although this data has considerable technological and economic benefits, it can also represent significant implications for public privacy. In this talk, we will explore the data generation capabilities of autonomous vehicles, as well as how this data can be managed and used to best serve companies and the general public.

MUSICC: an open repository for regulatory scenarios

Dr Zeyn Saigol
Principal technologist
Connected Places Catapult
UK
Verification and validation of AVs is a significant challenge for both industry and regulators, but scenario-based testing has recently emerged as a key component of the solution. This presentation will outline the UK Department for Transport’s MUSICC project, a major initiative that has created an open, secure repository for regulatory scenarios. MUSICC (Multi User Catalogue for Connected Autonomous Vehicles) will enable the community to interact with a working system and provide feedback to regulators on how scenario-based testing should fit into a future AV certification framework. The presentation will also cover MUSICC’s scenario representation format (which is built on top of OpenSCENARIO) and scenario management strategy.

Break

Will automated driving improve road safety? Certainty or wishful thinking?

Dr Karl Obermair
Director - future mobility solutions
TÜV Rheinland
GERMANY
The proponents of automated driving normally substantiate their optimism by referring to the fact that about 90% of all road accidents are caused by human error. The mainstream argument is that if we were able to eliminate the major source of error – the driver – 90% of road accidents could be eliminated too. But of course, this argument is far too simple. Referring to a whole set of fundamental patterns regarding human behavior and typical human reactions to technological innovations, it is far more realistic to expect backlash effects that will weaken the principal advantages of automation.

Autonomous shuttles and BRT: how can they add value and what are the risks?

Maud Bernard
Innovative transportation systems program director
Systra
FRANCE
Compared with existing transportation systems, autonomous shuttles are a new product; numerous trials are being launched all around the world. Autonomous shuttles have the potential to bring new services that traditional public transport cannot offer: ultra-flexibility (any time, anywhere). But what can they promise? Under what conditions? Do they really fit in the long term? Conversely, bus rapid transit (BRT) already exists to provide an efficient transportation solution in the urban context, benefiting from dedicated lanes and priority systems, and offering capacity. How can traditional transportation systems benefit from autonomous technology? And with what added value, risk and efficiency?

Mobility as a Service: the training platform for autonomous fleets

Mark Thomas
VP marketing/alliances
Ridecell
USA
Much has been written about the technology required to enable mainstream autonomous vehicle services. The right business model will also be critical to driving the adoption and profitability of autonomous mobility services. In fact, data insights and fleet management skills are prerequisites for success in the next stage of city mobility: autonomous car sharing. This session will review the solid practical experience to be gained from leveraging Mobility as a Service platforms to manage shared mobility programs with electric and Level 4 fleets today. Discussion topics include how to maximize asset utilization with multi-service models, and develop membership growth and retention capability.

Stream 3: Changing Landscape for the Automotive Industry

Ready for the urban future: mobility services at Volkswagen

Augustin Friedel
Intermodality services
Volkswagen Passenger Cars
GERMANY
Augustin will present the view of Volkswagen Passenger Cars on the status quo and the future of mobility services. Increasing urbanization, space limitations, changed customer behaviors and other indicators are creating demand for mobility services. One of Volkswagen's first offerings is the WeShare fully electric carsharing service, which is being rolled out in close cooperation with cities and charging infrastructure providers.

Monetizing automotive connected services

David Coleman
Director
Deloitte
GERMANY
OEMs have made significant investments in developing and implementing a connected services portfolio across their vehicle line-ups, and the enablers behind them. Now, OEMs need to consider a multitude of options to monetize connected services, whether customer-facing or internally. We will discuss the strategic choices facing OEMs in connected service monetization, as well as implications for investments, partnerships and data usage/brokerage. OEMs need to articulate a clear service monetization strategy, or risk being left with connected services that are unable to return their cost of capital.

The challenge for OEMs: autonomy becomes anonymity – rebuild brand definition and identity

Dr Patrick Ayad
Partner and global head automotive and mobility
Hogan Lovells
GERMANY
For car manufacturers, autonomy has the potential to give rise to anonymity. The challenge for the future will be in brand redefinition and identity. Many companies are already discussing the move from being car manufacturers to transport service providers, and how customers will change their perspective on what they are buying. Service and brand both have the potential to be redefined. This is an opportunity, not the end of the road.

Break

The future of mobility: reinventing the auto industry

Daron Gifford
Partner
Plante Moran
USA
Autonomous vehicles, Mobility as a Service and electrification are universally discussed megatrends that are on the verge of disrupting the existing auto industry. Taken together, they point to a fourth, less well defined, trend – a complete reordering of automotive manufacturing as we know it today. This represents the biggest change to the automobile – and every step in the automotive value chain, including design, assembly operations, supplier manufacturing, retailing, financing, and public and private infrastructure – in more than a century. Our research dives into the detail behind this new reality of the automotive industry.

Automotive mobility transformation – making new automotive business models successful

Wolf-Dieter Hoppe
Partner
Arthur D. Little
GERMANY
While the automotive industry's transition to electric mobility and new mobility solutions is underway, six main roles with underlying business models are emerging: integrated mobility platforms, mobility services bundles, operating systems and system integration with new players, large innovation and profit-sharing partnerships, transition toward back-end and value-added solutions, and shift in value-add for suppliers. Many players are missing an essential brick in their strategy. Arthur D. Little’s new market studies and set of business model success factors clearly set out concrete measures and approaches for OEMs and suppliers to keep their competitive positioning.

The mobility revolution: what does the relationship with customers look like in a MaaS world?

Jaime Moreno
CEO
Mormedi
SPAIN
As mobility shifts its focus from product to service, auto companies face the twin challenges of redefining their offers and differentiating their brands. What should auto companies do to win when the rules of the game are completely different? How can they discover and design for real – and diverse – customer needs? How can they ensure that they will own the customer relationship in a MaaS world, and not lose out to upstarts like Uber or even mobility aggregators? The presentation will explain how the strategic use of design principles can help companies evolve in a way that makes them indispensable to users.

Lunch

Future city planning in Japan – emerging opportunities in Mobility as a Service

Takehiro Miyoshi
Manager, connected vehicles and mobility services
Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance
JAPAN
Nissan is working enthusiastically to put new mobility services into practical use. We started 'robot taxi' field operation testing in Yokohama in 2017 and developed core services and technology. We believe the robot taxi is not simply a replacement fo conventional taxis; it offers a big opportunity to shift urban transportation systems and lifestyles. We plan to harmonize public transportation and private car with Mobility as a Service technology.

The journey toward autonomous mobility – a financial perspective

Boris Galonske
Managing director
Silverbergh Partners
SWITZERLAND
High expectations exist for autonomous mobility concepts. One might expect that quite soon we will be using autonomous cars and UAVs. Similar expectations exist in cargo, as new autonomous platforms are being announced and tested. Electric drivetrains are being introduced and it seems that combustion engines do not have long to live. To deliver on these expectations, a sound financial framework needs to evolve with clear roles and obligations to enable the identification, management and mitigation of risk. As technologies mature, such a financial framework will foster the scaling of mobility technologies and businesses.

Unlocking the potential of the new mobility ecosystem

Christian Hainz
Senior automotive analyst
EY
GERMANY
Urbanization, changing consumer expectations, regulation and emerging digital technologies are forming a new mobility ecosystem and setting the stage for immense innovation. The traditional automotive industry is shifting from building and selling assets toward Mobility as a Service solutions and offering a new mobility experience. New players and stakeholders are emerging within the new ecosystem, changing not only the transport experience but also value propositions and customer ownership. How can companies unlock the potential of the new mobility ecosystem?

Break

Are cities ready for the future of car sharing?

Olivier Reppert
CEO
Share Now
GERMANY
Big cities get lost in traffic. Fine dust is harmful to the health of people in urban areas. What do we need to do to make cities more livable again? Carsharing is just one possibility to reduce emissions and save space. On average, each shared car can replace up to five private cars. It's even better if those shared cars are fully electric. At the moment, every fifth trip of Share Now cars in Europe is already fully electric. The trend is increasing but even modern cities like Vienna face difficulties installing the infrastructure that is needed for e-carsharing.

Automotive evolution – then what?

Wouter Haspeslagh
Mobility expert
Granstudio
ITALY
Over the last century, cars have evolved into Swiss knives on wheels. But as our needs, wants and attitudes transform, do our cars still correspond with how we want to live and what we want our habitats to be? The automotive sector is screaming: “Look! No hands!” But then what? What happens if we research new vehicles, services or solutions that are in better balance with our lives and environments? What types of innovations emerge when you think outside the car-shaped box?

Agile contracts for user-centered services

Gerhard Deiters
Lawyer
BHO Legal
GERMANY
Innovation in the transportation sector (including autonomous vehicles, mobility and Transportation as a Service) is gaining momentum and requires developments to adapt to new technologies, requirements and user demands. Classical development contracts (e.g. waterfall model) require contract amendments in order to include changed requirements. Agile procedures embrace changes without a need to change the contract itself. Although technicians and engineers are used to such procedures, typical contract templates are not suitable for agile procedures. The presentation gives a short overview of the legal issues and provides solutions for core elements like definition of requirements, acceptance, customer undertakings and pricing provisions.

Risk mitigation in the global supply chain

Vanessa Miller
Partner
Foley & Lardner LLP
USA
Successful manufacturers focus on managing their supply chain risks through intelligent and aggressive risk management strategies. Truly successful companies are moving beyond mere risk management and asking how they can enhance the value of their supply chain in a complex, international environment by implementing long-term strategies in the ever-changing auto industry landscape. This presentation will cover specific strategies to employ across a company (legal, engineering, procurement and sales) to enhance the value of its global supply chain and mitigate risks. It will incorporate examples of issues and proposed solutions given trends in technology, autonomous vehicles, lightweighting and stringent emissions standards.

Break

Mobility as a Platform: a springboard for innovation

Ashish Khanna
Partner
L.E.K. Consulting
UK
New mobility trends, such as ride hailing and electrification, are driving improved transportation cost structures and bringing significant opportunities to the value chains of businesses. With the right approach, businesses across the economy can see mobility as a stimulus for business model innovation – but how can they identify new revenue opportunities and leverage new mobility services to improve their operating efficiency? L.E.K. Consulting’s Mobility as a Platform (MaaP) framework provides a lens through which businesses can consider options for growth, highlighting three key opportunities: acquiring new customers, improving customer experience and driving loyalty, and increasing the efficiency of business operations.

The green, shared mobility of the future: a sharing economy solution

Anders Wall
Chief international officer
GreenMobility
DENMARK
GreenMobility is a free-floating carsharing service operating 400 shared electric city cars in Copenhagen. It aims to offer a sharing economy solution for urbanites by providing easy access to mobility without the hassle of ownership. GreenMobility is built on three global megatrends: urbanization, the sharing economy and sustainability. We consider our concept to be one of the future transportation modes in urban areas, reducing the number of cars while caring for the environment at the same time. The near future of urban mobility is electric, accessible and simple. Are you ready to join the change?

Impact of robo-taxis on urban mobility and the automotive industry in Germany

Thomas Pottebaum
Director, automotive strategy
Deloitte Consulting GmbH
GERMANY
In recent years, autonomous driving and so-called robo-taxis have become some of the hottest topics in the automotive industry – and beyond. Autonomous vehicle forecasts predict sales of more than 30 million autonomous vehicles in 2040. Although the sharpest gains are expected to occur after 2030 compared with one million in 2025, commercial market introduction has already been announced by several OEMs for 2021. Based on our new market simulation model we have shed some light on the potential development of autonomous driving and urban mobility in Germany by 2035.

The role of OEMs in the future of mobility

Jasdeep Sawhney
Independent consultant - business transformation and business development, and developing partnerships in new mobility services
Independent Consultant
UK
The 20th century was defined by the auto revolution and car ownership. Urban and suburban infrastructure and life in the 20th century were designed around the car – commercial city centers with residential suburbs, highways for feeding the city centers from the suburbs, etc. Even public transportation was eventually adapted for this car-centric city structure. However, with rapid urban expansion, the 21st century is fast being defined by a reduction of urban quality of life – by traffic, congestion, air quality and inefficient space utilization. As a result, and certainly enabled and catalyzed by the smartphone revolution, new mobility solutions are emerging in cities in an attempt to break us from the shackles of car ownership and to democratize mobility. These new solutions have been expedited in certain cities due to the drying up of investment in public transport infrastructure. In this mobility revolution, the car is being reduced to being just another tool in a plethora of other tools that are enabling mass as well as MaaS mobility. The car is becoming the transporter of people just like the van has been the transporter of goods. It’s also important to note that almost all the players in the value chain of 20th-century transportation are converging, or at least attempting to converge toward Mobility as a Service, or MaaS. Everyone is trying to find their place in the value chain of 21st-century mobility. So what role do OEMs have to play in this disruption? And how will their role transform the car in the 21st century? Will they have a significant role in the new value chain, or will they be reduced to becoming the Foxconn of the mobility revolution? This presentation addresses the role of OEMs in 21st-century mobility – both in personal as well as logistics, and specifically in the urban and suburban environments. The presentation will address OEMs’ role in electrification (including new form factors), automation, legislation, 'fleetification', shared mobility, MaaS – and generally their transformation from metal benders to mobility solution providers

Veho – a traditional car dealer's journey in the future of mobility

Patrick Holm
Head of new ventures
Veho Oy Ab
FINLAND
For 80 years Veho has successfully been importing, distributing and servicing cars, vans, buses and trucks. The road has often been bumpy but the results mainly good. Now the whole industry is changing more than ever before. The roles of the players in automotive are changing, customers' buying habits are changing and financially very strong new competitors are entering the market. How will a local automotive player be successful in the next 80 years?

Stream 4: Connectivity - 5G, V2X & Cybersecurity

5G and beyond as communication for autonomous cars and drones

Dr Walter Weigel
Vice president and CSO European Research Institute
Huawei Technologies
BELGIUM
Research in 5G is addressing wireless communication for many critical applications, such as intelligent transport systems (ITS). A very important use case is communication for autonomous vehicles, especially cars and drones. These are equipped with a multitude of sensors and actors and will require high-rate connectivity for applications such as sensor sharing and virtual reality. Communication between the vehicle and the infrastructure or between the vehicles themselves has to guarantee parameters like latency and reliability. The presentation will give insights into real 5G tests with cars, and the respective design of the radio interface. It will also provide an overview of specific challenges for autonomous drones and discuss how these challenges can be addressed in future research, leading to '5G and beyond'.

Making vehicles smarter and safer with C-V2X

Martin Beltrop
Head of automotive
Nokia Mobile Networks
UK
This presentation will focus on why the architecture of 5G truly matters for successful automotive transformation. Communication and connectivity are key to the development of autonomous vehicles. Cellular-based technologies will be essential for transforming the entire mobility ecosystem thanks to VX2 technology. With a strong evolutionary path to 5G, C-V2X technology will offer superior performance to help connected vehicles communicate with transport infrastructure, leading to less congestion, reduced emissions and a smoother driving experience.

Integrating and validating vehicle-to-vehicle communication for safety applications

Syed Mahmud
Senior engineer
Hyundai America Technical Center
USA
One of the latest developments in connected vehicle technologies is vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communication using the dedicated short-range communication (DSRC) protocol, which operates in the 5.9GHz wireless band. In V2V communication, each vehicle continually transmits basic safety messages (BSM). In this paper, the performance of V2V safety applications such as forward collision warning (FCW), emergency electronic brake lights (EEBL), left turn assist (LTA) and intersection movement assist (IMA) is demonstrated based on prototype V2V systems that were integrated into two Hyundai vehicles. The prototype system in the present investigation uses an onboard unit (OBU), which is connected to the CANbus and a GNSS/DSRC antenna to generate and transmit BSMs over the air to other vehicle displays, based on the Android operating system. It has been built into both vehicles to display warnings to inform drivers of potential threats. The validation test process consists of driving a test route with a minimum of two V2V-equipped vehicles: one is the host vehicle (HV) and the other is a remote vehicle (RV). Test results showed that the V2V safety applications have been demonstrated successfully in real-world testing utilizing two Hyundai vehicles.

Break

ITS and cybersecurity challenges

Steve Bowles
Director - IoT operations
360 Network Solutions
USA
Traffic networks have migrated to Ethernet over the years. These networks have been closed and isolated with very limited access to the outside via the internet. As technology improves with software analytics and cloud computing, the security of these once isolated networks must be addressed. Physical security of ITS cabinets has always relied on locking the cabinet or changing the lock so that standard keys do not work. Network security, on the other hand, involves not just locking the door but also understanding the threat and implementing security at points of entry to the network.

5G trials for future transport and mobility

Alina Koskela
Special adviser
Finnish Transport and Communications Agency Traficom
FINLAND
Connected and automated mobility services require communication networks for reliable data exchange. With high capacity, short delay and low power consumption, 5G has the potential to offer new development paths for smart cities and industries based on new services for moving people and goods. In order to understand what types of 5G networks are needed to enable this evolution, Finnish Transport and Communications Agency Traficom actively enables and promotes 5G trials in all transport modes. This presentation will compile the results of 5G trials active in Finland and showcase the benefits of public-private cooperation for 5G development.

Real-life demonstrators of 5G in the West Midlands

John Paddington
Innovation integration lead, Public Sector
Transport for West Midlands
UK
This presentation will focus on the work the West Midlands is doing to encourage 5G at a city region level. We are the first regional 5G testbed in the UK. This has unlocked up to £50m of public- and private-sector funding to develop 5G services. The presentation will describe how the West Midlands is building the testbed and what work is being done with mobile operators and infrastructure providers to accelerate the adoption of 5G. Mobility is also a key focus and the presentation will describe how we are looking to develop quick wins, long-term use cases and also how 5G fits with work being undertaken in the West Midlands around connected and autonomous vehicles.

Lunch

Cybersecurity considerations for the future of Canadian mobility

Alexandra Cutean
Senior director, research and policy
Information and Communications Technology Council
CANADA
This talk will cover the cybersecurity needs and considerations for Canadian critical infrastructure, in particular road authorities. It will cover topics such as multi-modal transportation networks, connected and autonomous vehicles, and other key elements of mobility as Canadian cities develop and change via technological disruption. The talk will also investigate the talent and skills needed to cope with these changes, including specific skill needs and gaps for cybersecurity and digital talent working in transportation.

The role of 5G in the automotive ecosystem

Julian Diederichs
Consultant
McKinsey & Company
GERMANY
The importance of connectivity within the automotive ecosystem is increasing. Connectivity is not only required for passenger entertainment, but also for other applications such as safety-critical software and firmware updates, map updates for self-driving cars and shared mobility platforms. As a result, connectivity is becoming essential for key disruptions in the automotive space, especially autonomous driving and shared mobility. 5G brings higher bandwidths and lower latency with higher reliability than existing 4G or LTE networks, enabling new safety-critical applications to run on 5G networks. The presentation will introduce and discuss a selection of connectivity use cases enhanced by 5G.

Break

5G: connectivity, convergence and collision in the automotive sector

Nick Reeve
Partner, patent attorney
Reddie & Grose LLP
UK
Telecommunications, computing and automotive technologies are increasingly converging with the new generation of self-driving cars. Incumbent car companies like Toyota and Volvo sense danger, as their business models are challenged, while existing technology and disruptive startup companies sense new opportunities and markets. All players in this exciting new market will need to take intellectual property (IP) into consideration to avoid collision and navigate pitfalls along the road. In this talk, we will look at emerging IP trends in the 5G and autonomous vehicle space, such as collaboration and tie-ups, patent pools, standards and licensing.

Can 5G keep its promises for a better transport system of the future?

Reiner Stuhlfauth
Technology manager wireless
Rohde & Schwarz International GmbH
GERMANY
5G is expected to be everything to everyone: the connectivity for autonomous motoring, the channel for masses of IoT data, the medium for smart manufacturing and Industry 4.0. 5G is incredibly complex. New services are on the horizon, such as the C-V2X evolution implementing 5G NR side link, and the specification work on some of the more complex features has even just begun. Telcos will have to tackle the challenges associated with designing, building and testing infrastructure equipment and networks. This presentation will provide unique insight, share best practices and discuss current challenges for testing and validating key enabler technologies, such as wireless communication testing, over-the-air (OTA) test challenges and solutions to guarantee a certain level of security in 5G communication.

Vehicle data in the connected car context - privacy, data ownership, data economy and cooperative intelligent transport systems

Stephan Appt
Partner
Pinsent Masons LLP
GERMANY
The presentation will cover: privacy – dealing with GDPR in the connected car context; an update on e-privacy regulation and its impact on automotive; data ownership – who will have access in the future to the data in/from the vehicle; an update on the extended vehicle discussion and on the status of the EU Commission's thoughts regarding vehicle data; European data economy – the EU's view on data monopolies; and cooperative intelligent transport systems – new rules stepping up the deployment of C-ITS on Europe's roads, and what this means in the data context.

Developing a cybersecurity failsafe by implementing a data consortium for the transportation industry

Thomas Davies
Partner
EY
CANADA
The emergence of 5G mobile networks and technologies will provide a game-changing platform that will revolutionize the transportation industry. But with this change will come broader cybersecurity threats, specifically relating to data. New attack vectors will exploit weaknesses in this emerging technology and its data. We will explore how to develop a cybersecurity failsafe by implementing a data consortium for the transportation industry, and how best practices from existing consortiums are applicable to the future of transportation. A successful consortium will be a collaborative big data environment, anonymized and tokenized so all the vehicle information is stored and shared securely without privacy issues.

Break

Improving the in-vehicle experience and security with an operations center

Nurit Peres
Senior product manager
Harman
ISRAEL
The modern vehicle is like a sophisticated and connected laptop on wheels. With millions of connected and semi-autonomous vehicles on the road, OEMs will need a central system based on data coming from the vehicles and their perimeter. An operations center will enable OEMs to provide a smooth, secure driving experience to customers. This presentation will show how the automotive operations center is a critical solution for mobility services, proactive cybersecurity and incident management. With the increased importance of data and connectivity, the significance of allowing automotive situational awareness, security detection, feedback loop, forensic investigation, remote updates and incident response management rises as well. An operations center will enable OEMs to provide new services and support a smooth driving and riding experience for customers. This presentation will show how the operations center is a critical solution for transportation in a 5G and mobility era, allowing automotive situational awareness, health and security detection, AI feedback loop, supply chain visibility, investigation, remote updates and incident response management.

Cooperative, connected and automated mobility – experiences in European test cases scenarios

Lara Moura
Research and innovation manager
A-to-Be
PORTUGAL
A-to-Be and Brisa are partners under SCOOP@F Part 2, which includes the validation of C-ITS services in open-road, cross-border tests with other EU Member States (France, Spain and Austria) and the development of a hybrid communication solution (3G-4G/ITS-G5). C-Roads Portugal is co-funded by the European Union and the objective is to large-scale deploy C-ITS services on five macro pilots where new use cases will be designed and verified. Brisa and A-to-Be are actively contributing to this implementation and the interoperability validation among different Portuguese operators. AUTOC-ITS was a project co-funded by the European Union aiming to contribute to the deployment of cooperative services, improving and promoting the use of C-ITS systems for connected autonomous vehicles (CAV).

Is sharing caring? The implications of sharing proprietary data on security

Nina Rosenbach
Attorney
Segal McCambridge Singer & Mahoney
USA
There are security concerns about the exchange of data that must be resolved before autonomous vehicles and smart cities can truly be defined as safe. This presentation looks at whether the sharing of data increases or decreases these risks. Particularly, it will address the potential for blockchain to provide a solution to potential security risks, as well as the potential for consumers to be more at risk when only one system is used universally. Finally, it will address the legal implications of sharing to promote security, and what to do in the event of a breach.

5G, MaaS and financial transactions

Dr Kristin Gilkes
Managing director
EY
USA
MaaS is set to override the transportation concept of the future, and digitization is set to override the financial transaction of the future. As 5G enhancements create more reliable, available and responsive networks, the volume of online transactions will multiply rapidly. 5G’s ability to collect a steady stream of data from customers, including financial transaction spend data, will enable MaaS providers to deliver custom services on the fly, virtually, wherever the customer resides. We explore potential 5G MaaS use cases utilizing financial transactions, location awareness, augmented reality and facial recognition as part of an advanced customer identity and enhanced experience model.

Lunch

Resilience and robustness techniques in vehicular communications

Awais Khan
Researcher
Institute of Telecommunications
PORTUGAL
In vehicular opportunistic networks, routes are computed at each hop while the packet is being forwarded, and on each node, local knowledge is used to decide which is the best next-hop among other neighbors. Opportunistic networks are flexible for forwarding data since every single node acts as a gateway; however, the opportunistic forwarding process comes with a price of additional delay and overheads. Moreover, in vehicular opportunistic networks, there are several other issues, which will be discussed in this presentation.

Stream 5: Energy - Powering the Future of Transport

The implementation of SNCF's sustainable energy roadmap

Olivier Menuet
President
SNCF Energie
FRANCE
SNCF Group is one of the world's top companies in passenger and freight mobilities (annual turnover: €34bn) and the top electricity consumer in France. Its total annual energy consumption is 17TWh for a spend of €1.2bn. The presentation will discuss the implementation of SNCF's strategic roadmap toward 'responsible and sustainable energy': efficiency, greening the mix, procurement performance, production and self-consumption, and technologies (hybridization, hydrogen, etc.).

Presentation title and synopsis TBC

Jörg Reimann
CEO
CHARGE NOW / PARK NOW
GERMANY

The International Energy Agency’s Global EV Outlook 2019

Dr Jacopo Tattini
Transport and energy analyst
International Energy Agency
FRANCE
Electric mobility continues to grow rapidly, supported by policies, by cost reductions achieved via technology developments and by the increased dynamism of market actors. The International Energy Agency’s Global EV Outlook 2019 (GEVO2019) analyzes the status of electric mobility and explores its future development. It projects that the global EV stock in 2030 will reach more than 130 and 250 million respectively in the New Policy Scenario and EV30@30 Scenario. GEVO2019 assesses the implications for electricity demand, oil displacement and well-to-wheel GHG emissions, and compares lifecycle GHG emissions across different powertrains, finally reflecting on the sustainability of the EV battery materials supply chain.

Break

Toyota's approach to vehicle electrification and new mobility

Dr Stephan Herbst
Technical general manager hydrogen
Toyota Motor Europe
BELGIUM
Decarbonizing the transport sector requires an acceleration in the development of electric and hydrogen vehicles. This presentation focuses on Toyota's approach and the wider systems implications.

Toward a fully electric transport system

Volker Blandow
Global head of e-mobility
TÜV Süd China Holding
HONG KONG
Developments in the global vehicle population – which grows at a rate of 100 million vehicles every three years – are drastically exacerbating the emission situation locally and globally. What are the answers to this global challenge? Electrification has to materialize way earlier than many stakeholders believe today. There are various technical options to make this happen: battery-powered EV, hydrogen-powered EV or even dynamic inductive charging systems. What are the advantages of the different options? What does an overall strategy including an energy transition look like? What challenges are we facing on the materials side if the whole world goes electric?

Reshaping energy infrastructure to enable grid integration of EVs

Rubina Singh
Channel propositions manager
Centrica Business Solutions
UK
The transport landscape has undergone unprecedented change over the past decade and is set to continue developing rapidly as the automotive industry electrifies. This will also require significant additional grid capacity to support the rapid expansion of EVs. Developing the right infrastructure is paramount to enable this transition. A combination of smart technologies along with distributed energy systems can not only help address the power challenge but also create opportunities in the future to enable a fully integrated grid. What will the future of e-mobility look like? This presentation will address how seamless grid integration of EVs can be enabled.

Lunch

Could electric vehicles threaten power systems?

Dr Alexandre Oudalov
Manager - power systems of the future
ABB Power Grids
SWITZERLAND
This paper studies the impact of the growing electromobility fleet on European power systems from 2017-2040. We will use publicly available data on driving habits and technical vehicle parameters to estimate temporal and locational charging needs from different classes of electric vehicles. Together with country-specific power system data and grid topologies, we will demonstrate potential challenges from the new demand: generation adequacy and flexibility, overloading of grid assets, etc. We will suggest technical solutions to mitigate these impacts (batteries, increased cross-border interconnection capacity and smart charging strategies) and provide a rough estimation of the dimensions for these technical solutions.

Roadmap for the electrification of buses in the Barcelona region

Lluís Alegre
Mobility director
ATM Barcelona
SPAIN
One particularly efficient measure to tackle pollution in urban areas is the electrification of buses. The project represents a huge challenge for the transport sector, first because high initial investment is required to set up the electricity infrastructure, and second because electric buses are not in widespread production and the purchasing cost of electric vehicles is more expensive than for conventional buses. The electrification of the public transport bus fleets requires at least a regional plan with a long-term vision that guarantees enough electricity supply from renewable sources, making the infrastructure and supply more efficient.

Encouraging low-carbon vehicle take-up for commercial and private users

David Hytch
Head of strategy and innovation
Franklin Energy Limited
UK
The initial excitement around the availability of EVs and other low-carbon vehicles created the debate around charging and range. This paper will examine how the charging industry and energy suppliers are taking the steps necessary to provide Charging as a Service to ensure that the refueling network can meet demand for all use cases in the future. The demand from private cars differs from that of taxis, commercial vehicles, public transport and off-road vehicles. The paper will show how these can be addressed individually and in a way that fits with wider energy accounts.

Break

Charging of autonomous car fleets in urban areas – fast, automatic and optimized

Michael Stautz
Manager innovation strategy
E.ON SE
GERMANY
Autonomous driving and not the question of propulsion technologies will be THE game changer. People will no longer own cars; they will use them. Mobility is likely to become a commodity. Platform providers for mobility services will dominate the transport sector for passengers and goods. Modular vehicle systems (passengers and goods) are likely to become the standard for mobility platforms. Fleet operators are eager to increase the operational hours of their vehicles charging the autonomous fleet. The charging business is changing from mainly B2C today to B2B only in the future. Fueling vehicles will become an M2M (machine-to-machine) business in urban fleet charging spots. Inductive charging will develop to a default technology – outlook toward dynamic inductive charging.

Understanding the implication of batteries used in transport

Celine Cluzel
Director
Element Energy
UK
This presentation will summarize key lessons and real-world implications from recent projects that assessed complementary aspects of battery life, answering the following questions. How long will batteries last in a car, and will managed charging affect this? (Degradation findings based on a state of health model that uses real-world usage data under different charging behavior.) What are the current recycling options in Europe? Is there enough capacity? What are the costs of repurposing batteries and competitiveness with new batteries? (From a T&E study that supports lobbying for an update of the Battery Directive.)

Wireless charging: driving EV adoption and the autonomous future

Peter Wambsganss
Director business development, Europe - automotive
WiTricity
GERMANY
The future of transportation is electric, and wireless charging serves as a catalyst for the increased adoption of electric vehicles. Wireless charging is as efficient and as fast as conventional plug-in charging, much more convenient, and essential for the electric autonomous vehicles of the near future. With the explosive growth taking place in Mobility as a Service, WiTricity is poised to provide a solution for a future that is electric, shared and autonomous.

Battery design and energy storage technology for eVTOL applications

Dr Limhi Somerville
Battery systems technical specialist
Vertical Aerospace
UK
The electrochemical battery is one of the newest and most technically challenging parts of an eVTOL. In this presentation, key battery design features and testing are discussed in terms of capability to meet demanding certification requirements and practicality on-vehicle. The presenter will draw extensively from previous experience in the automotive industry dealing with the interface between electrochemical constraints, the physical design of the battery and the capability of the battery management system.

The race of technology – the right technology choice for future propulsion

Gernot Hacker
Senior product manager, electrified propulsion systems
AVL List GmbH
AUSTRIA
The connection of the automobile with its environment and autonomous driving enables highly efficient and safe operation of the automobile and will create new mobility scenarios. The demands for significant reductions in CO2 and pollutants have a lasting impact on both the manufacturing cost of vehicles and the necessary investments in infrastructure. For sufficiently rapid market penetration, new propulsion technologies must be affordable for the customer and there must be a correspondingly attractive infrastructure available. Mid-term, a shift from CO2 assessment to well-to-wheel, possibly even a broader lifecycle approach, is expected. This presentation will discuss the right technology choice for future propulsion.

Break

Drawing on Linklaters’ original research, what are the biggest regulatory and market challenges to the commercialization of the electric vehicle battery?

Ruth Knox
Managing associate
Linklaters
UK
This presentation will draw on analysis from our Thought Leadership Report on regulatory and market challenges across the battery lifecycle. Topics will include sourcing raw materials, battery manufacturing, incorporation into, and sale of, EVs, the recharging of EVs and finally battery recycling.

Wireless EV charging will accelerate EV adoption

Andrew Daga
President and CEO
Momentum Dynamics
USA
The presentation will discuss the essential need for automatic inductive charging of EVs. The first project presented will be a battery-electric transit bus that has been in service in the State of Washington for two years without interruption of service. The 200kW inductive charger has extended the all-weather driving range of the bus so that it can drive long routes using opportunity charging while keeping the battery state of charge constantly above 70%. The presentation will also describe the upcoming 24/7 electric taxi program being installed in Oslo, Norway. None of these vehicles rely on conductive charging and operate completely automatically.

The BEV and FCEV situation – coupling the mobility and energy sectors

Egbert Hünewaldt
CEO
Green Business Development GmbH
GERMANY
As an introduction, we will explore the current situation in Europe for battery-electric vehicles (BEV), the charging infrastructure, the volume of new registrations and the consequences of this. We will then move on to fuel cell-electric vehicles (FCEV), exploring the advantages and disadvantages of hydrogen vs BEV. We will also highlight possible future options for powering vehicles. A country can be at the forefront of alternative mobility, but a sustainable solution is only possible at the European level.

Battery health check – electrochemical diagnostics of automotive battery systems

Dr Michael Whiteley
Director of strategic alliance
UCL
UK
The automotive industry is going through its biggest transformation since the introduction of the internal combustion engine in the late 1800s. Electrification R&D is well underway and expanding rapidly, leaving a void in the knowledge-base in relation to how battery systems behave and degrade during use under varied load profiles. The Advanced Propulsion Lab at University College London is a world leader in battery diagnostics. This talk looks into the various techniques that can be used to determine battery degradation and ultimately mitigation to increase battery life.

Lunch

Hydrogen-powered high-speed inter-urban mobility

Charlotte Jurus
Public affairs officer
Spacetrain
FRANCE
Spacetrain is a French company developing a high-speed (500km/h) transportation system powered by hydrogen fuel cells for inter-urban trips. The presentation will discuss the recent emergence of hydrogen mobility (automotive, rail), and outline the technical progress in the hydrogen sector, focusing on Alstom's hydrogen train but also the progress made in hydrogen storage and fuel cell capacity. There will also be a discussion on the future of the hydrogen mobility sector with a focus on the aviation industry and high-speed mobility.

Building the all-electric, on-demand future: lessons learned from EV deployments in partnership with transit operators around the world

Victoria Markewitz
Business development principal
ViaVan
GERMANY
In public-private partnerships (P3) around the world, cities and new mobility companies are taking steps toward an all-electric future. This session will share lessons learned from Via’s EV deployments in partnership with transit operators around the world. In Auckland, New Zealand, Via partnered with GoBus to deploy the first on-demand transit P3 to use a fully electric fleet. Furthermore, ViaVan’s partnership with the BVG in Berlin is the largest public-sector on-demand deployment in the world and is operated by a 60% all-electric fleet.

E-mobility and autonomous driving – the solution is wireless

Daniel Dörflinger
CEO
IPT Technology GmbH
GERMANY
The key to the successful introduction of e-mobility is to make it a leap forward in user experience. A high level of automation will be key to a positive user experience. As a consequence, wireless charging can play a key role in the successful implementation of future transportation solutions.

Break

How silicon carbide (SiC) is improving EV applications

John Palmour
CTO - power and RF
Cree Inc
USA
Flying cars and autonomous vehicles are interesting and futuristic, but the key to achieving these technologies lies within mastering the electric vehicle. It’s estimated that 3.6 million EVs will be manufactured by 2022, and auto makers have committed billions of dollars to growing their fleets. The task of mastering the EV may seem daunting, but in reality it's quite simple. This presentation will explore the invisible revolution of silicon carbide (SiC) technology, which has the power to transform the future of the automotive industry and overcome the challenges facing EVs, including range anxiety, inadequate infrastructure and charging time.

Accelerating electrification: critical steps toward electric vehicle mass adoption

Ashish Khanna
Partner
L.E.K. Consulting
UK
Electric vehicles (EVs) represent the future of transportation. Car manufacturers are announcing plans to produce greater volumes and models, and governments are actively encouraging their adoption through incentives. Yet, despite a rapid escalation in EV investment in recent years, consumers have been slow to respond. So what exactly does it take to encourage the mass adoption of EVs? L.E.K. Consulting examines the three most important supply and demand factors that will drive EV uptake: cost competitiveness with ICEs, access to public infrastructure, and EV model availability. We also discuss the implications for original equipment manufacturers and policymakers.

Stream 6: Mobility As A Service

How to design a user-centric MaaS system

Piia Karjalainen
Senior manager
ERTICO - ITS Europe
BELGIUM
In its recent publication 'Recommendation on a User-Centric Approach for MaaS' (published in April 2019), the MaaS Alliance has identified a number of factors as pivotal for the MaaS user, affecting both the digital and physical user experience. The whole transport sector has a unique opportunity to redesign the ecosystem to be something better, more user friendly and more inclusive than it has been to date, and this framework can be used to identify the complex variety of individual user needs and requirements.

Mobility as a Service – common issues and how to succeed

Liane Meister
Distinguished engineer
T-Systems
GERMANY
Mobility as a Service is a worldwide concept for orchestrating mobility. Nevertheless, as there are several players, there are also several technical solutions and concepts in place at several maturity levels. Municipalities are looking for different technical solutions to those sought by common industry big players in the automotive or rail industry who are looking for strategic options in which their products can keep up or even be part of the business models of the future. This presentation will outline common issues the aforementioned interest groups have experienced so far with their technical solutions and roadmaps, including the advantages/disadvantages, successes and failures.

The challenges of integrating and regulating MaaS

Dr Patrick Ayad
Partner and global head automotive and mobility
Hogan Lovells
GERMANY
Finnish capital city Helsinki aims to make private vehicle ownership redundant by 2025, and other cities will follow. By offering a digital service that integrates the entire transportation network and end-to-end journey planning, transportation will be made highly convenient and cashless. This presentation will examine MaaS and what it means to all current mass-transportation providers, automotive manufacturers, rail operators, taxi firms, new mobility providers and small-scale private providers of the last-mile transportation operations of the future. The challenges of integrating and regulating so many forms of transport and so many providers will be significant.

Break

Smart mobility growth opportunities through strategic collaboration

Shwetha Surender
Industry principal - mobility
Frost & Sullivan
UK
The mobility landscape in cities is transforming rapidly. Discrete, siloed, narrow definitions of transportation are giving way to broader, more inclusive and sustainable concepts of mobility. The future of mobility will be highly integrated, electric and autonomous, and will be aimed at improving the user travel experience. Strategic collaborations among important stakeholders, both public and private, in terms of operating models, car usage, multimodal journey planning and payment options will drive smart mobility objectives in cities.

Connecting the Berlin mobility network

Christof Schminke
Managing director commercial hub Berlin
Trafi
LITHUANIA
In today's mobility industry, everyone is fighting for the user, not realizing that the battle they should be focusing on is the bustling city. Trafi, a technology platform for mobility, and BVG, the main public transport company in Berlin, are forming a new partnership aimed at connecting the entire mobility system in the city. This is the first time that a European city the size of Berlin has deeply integrated an entire mobility network, spanning public and private operators, in order to make it easier for people to access and use different types of transport.

Mobility as a Service: The Next Transport Disruption

Emma Edgar
Manager
L.E.K. Consulting
UK
Mobility services across the board are facing a revolution. Changing attitudes to private vehicle ownership and increasing pressure on the economics of mobility mean that the transport industry is experiencing unprecedented disruption from a technology enabler – Mobility as a Service (MaaS). What is MaaS, when should we anticipate its arrival, and what benefits will it bring for consumers and transport providers? L.E.K. examines the key factors driving MaaS, the roles that different parties will play in the MaaS ecosystem, opportunities for consumers and transport authorities, and the imperatives for governments and private mobility suppliers to consider their positioning.

Lunch

The advent of inclusive micromobility

Nicola Dallatana
Head of new e-mobility division
Toyota Tsusho
BELGIUM
The debate on micromobility has recently been dominated by the safety challenges where there are no clear compliance and traffic law frameworks to regulate use now or in the future. Operators have demonstrated that the most active part of the population wants an increased offering in urban mobility. One topic that has not been sufficiently addressed is how micromobility has the potential to transform the lives of people who would not be considered ‘active’ users and who are currently under-served by new mobility innovations. Based on his long experience with light electric vehicles, wheelchairs and personal mobility devices, Nicola will talk about what he calls the advent of inclusive micro-mobility and how this will likely impact the way we will all move around in the city of the future.

Symbiotic transportation and city: a model for success

Dr Stéphane Gervais
Executive VP strategic innovation
Lacroix Group
FRANCE
Targeting mobility that will be inclusive, multimodal and MaaS, the city architecture should dramatically change (car park, roads, etc.), which also implies changes in our society and way of living. By fully digitizing the city through multisensors and connectivity, the overall traffic can be managed in a predictive and adaptive way. Moreover, city architecture can evolve according to citizen needs and city manager strategy. Open innovation, co-construction and shift of power are some key enablers as well. Indeed, we figured out a model based on our numerous experimentations on autonomous transportation projects and longtime involvement in smart mobility.

Airports as MaaS platform operators

Tine Haas
Principal
Dornier Consulting International GmbH
GERMANY
With the mobility behavior of passengers changing from using private cars to shared mobility offers, airports are under pressure to make up for lost parking revenue. Being operators of MaaS platforms would afford airports more control managing landside access. At the same time, airports could help the surrounding region gain convenient city access. Can airports serve as mobility hubs for the region and foster economic growth by providing mobility services? MaaS platforms could also play an important role in the management of traffic movements related to airport staff, which put considerable pressure on airport access infrastructure.

Break

The economic potential of Mobility as a Service

Jan Tijs Nijssen
Associate principal
McKinsey & Company
NETHERLANDS
The presentation will discuss the size of the market/value pool for Mobility as a Service, the ways in which the market might develop, the players that are emerging and what it will take to win.

Developing a mobility service performance index

Balazs Csuvar
CAV lead
DG Cities
UK
Mobility as a Service is becoming central to the development of smart cities. Adoption of new transport offers is rapid, but understanding their overall, cumulative impact on urban microcosms is limited. That is what DG Cities aims to answer. Through the development of a mobility service performance index, DG Cities will attribute a measure to any mobility service in a given urban ecosystem. The framework will provide a vantage point for decision makers, enabling an analytical ranking of services by prioritizing a city’s objectives. DG Cities is building an articulate appraisal scheme that is tailor-made for the future of transport.

Dynamic mobility management for mobility as a public service

Christina Hubin
Research and development division lead
Upstream Mobility
AUSTRIA
The DyNaMo (Dynamic Mobility Management ) project calculates a total optimum for a given input of persons and providers. It processes static, dynamic as well as historical, real-time and forecasted data. We developed a graph optimization model that processes data, capacity of the vehicles and infrastructure as well as supply and user demands. This dynamic mobility management system provides information for the optimal offer-distance-time-transport relation in simulation, in real time and in forecast. The output of this learning system creates the total optimum for every single user demand in correlation to the number of demands and the traffic conditions.

Legal challenges for MaaS platforms

Dr Jan Bonhage
Partner
Hengeler Mueller
GERMANY
Platforms that bring together users and mobility providers will be an infrastructural backbone of many MaaS models. Several legal, structural and regulatory challenges arise in such platform schemes where service intermediaries substitute traditional service providers or mobility through individual vehicle ownership. This panel contribution will address the legal framework for platform models and increasingly relevant issues such as asset control and data ownership, privacy, consumer protection, competition, IT security, liability and regulatory evasion.

Break

Developing the sustainability advantages of rail with MaaS

Margrethe Sagevik
Head of sustainability
Vy
NORWAY
MaaS represents unique opportunities to develop the sustainability advantages of rail even further and respond to even more of the UN's sustainable development goals. To ensure this, we must develop win-win-win partnerships and together strive for the best and smartest door-to-door solutions. We must also set sustainable requirements for the whole supply chain to all services and products, supporting the principles of the circular economy. Will the rail sector rest on its laurels or rise to the occasion?

Moovizy 2 – MaaS with 25,000 frequent users in France

Werner Kutil
International business development manager
Cityway
FRANCE
The presentation will provide detailed information on the Moovizy MaaS project. In the Saint-Etienne Metropolitan Area in France, citizens will be able to manage their mobility in a completely new way. With the help of Cityway, provider of IT solutions for MaaS, at the end of 2019 the Saint-Etienne Metropolitan Area will launch its full MaaS application: Moovizy 2. With Moovizy 2, thanks to a single smartphone application people will have high-quality multimodal real-time information including intermodal real-time and predictive journey planning; multimodal m-ticketing (use (book, unlock, validate) and pay) within the French Metropolitan Area of Saint-Etienne.

Bridging the gap between current operational standards in autonomous testing and the requirements of public transport systems

Tom Williams
Director of technology and innovation
Ascendal Group
UK
This talk will discuss the work required to bridge the gap between current operational standards in autonomous tests and trials and what is expected in public transport services. Two worlds with different approaches to operations are converging, and we have to ensure that we can deliver safe, reliable, customer-focused public transport solutions leveraging new technology. Achieving this will require changes to regulations, technology tailored to public transport standards, and an evolution in the way traditional operators deliver services. We will discuss our work to date and the challenges that will face the mobility ecosystem.

Meaningful mobility: how Switzerland is becoming a land of happy commuters

Andreas Fuhrer
Master program manager
SBB Swiss Railways
SWITZERLAND
For many people, mobility is a hassle. For national economies, it's a costly necessity. We are turning things upside down by fostering meaningful mobility emphasizing quality of life. A key element is the national digital infrastructure integrating all modes of transport from public transportation to car- and ridesharing, robotaxis and innovative slow mobility. In this talk we will explain the concept of meaningful mobility and what is underway to facilitate it, from the already implemented core integrating 250 transport companies, to the current work on an open digital infrastructure for shared mobility.

Lunch

Enabling an open, decentralized, blockchain-enabled MaaS ecosystem

Dr Boyd Cohen
CEO
Iomob
SPAIN
In this presentation, Iomob's CEO will demonstrate the latest deployments of the company's decentralized, open MaaS platform, including a project with Renfe, Spain's national rail service, and Ford Motors in the USA. He will challenge the status quo of the MaaS market and invite others to participate in the open mobility marketplace.

On-demand mobility integrated into MaaS

Dr Darian Heim
Director of growth
Sparelabs Inc
SPAIN
This presentation will deal with the lessons from the integration of Sparelab's (Vancouver) GoPass on-demand technology MaaS app in Dallas, Texas, which won APTA's 2019 Innovation Award. It will discuss the organization and expansion of the currently 14 sub-zones (planned: >25) in the periphery of Dallas, where a flexible on-demand service feeds passengers into high-frequency light-rail trunk lines. It will also deal with the design of a user-centric consultation and booking process for journeys with flexible and fixed legs, plus mixing fleets of dedicated operator-owned vehicles and undedicated privately owned taxis to deliver on-demand service in peak hours.

Shift2Rail as an enabler for Mobility as a Service through innovation

Marco Ferreira
Systems engineer
Thales Portugal SA
PORTUGAL
Mobility is undergoing significant transformations but also facing challenges. Hyperconnectivity is changing the way people address mobility and the paradigm of seamless travel. Mobility as a Service (MaaS) is an emerging concept that considers the mobility system as a whole, improving its efficiency and sustainability, and benefiting operators and travelers. This paper focuses on the active position taken by Shift2Rail; proposing and demonstrating a technological enabler addressing MaaS; aiming to provide tools and guidelines to ease the entry of transport operators into fully multimodal ecosystems; supporting efficient, seamless and pleasant travel experiences for passengers; and strongly contributing to a reduction in the impact of transport on the environment.

Break

Shift2Rail: digitization of the transport ecosystem to promote intermodal transportation

Dr Juan Castro Arias
R&D project manager
Indra Sistemas SA
SPAIN
Shift2Rail (S2R) is the first European rail initiative to seek focused research and innovation and market-driven solutions by accelerating the integration of new and advanced technologies into innovative rail product solutions. S2R Innovation Program 4 (IP4) seeks to increase the attractiveness of railway transport by offering transparent and integrated door-to-door trips to promote multimodal transport. Hence, it is fully aligned with the MaaS approach. The CONNECTIVE project, included in IP4, is developing an interoperability framework that allows the integration of multimodal services. CONNECTIVE is also working on new business analytics techniques to perform useful analysis.

Smart cities should start with self-driving public transit

Dennis Mica
Business development manager
2getthere
NETHERLANDS
Today, many cities are trying to remove cars from their cities. It is a worthwhile initiative, but there is often a lack of good alternatives for traveling toward your destination. 2getthere will explain more about the current possibilities of self-driving public transit systems, their current technical status and their benefits. Sharing rides will mean less space needed for cars and more space for citizens. In addition, 2getthere will provide insights into the projects under contract: real projects that actually solve a transit need, without a steward or attendant on board.

Stream 7: Quantum Effects Through Big & Small Changes

The role of the Innovation and Networks Executive Agency in supporting research and innovation

Alan Haigh
Head of department, research and innovation
European Commission
BELGIUM
The European Commission supports transport research innovation and deployment through the implementation of many funding programs. The Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation program and the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) are two such programs implemented by the Innovation and Networks Executive Agency (INEA). The total value of the EC grants administered at INEA is currently approaching €33bn. This presentation will highlight elements of each program and examples of the topic areas from aviation to urban mobility. Future funding opportunities will also be highlighted.

Where are we now? Hyperloop development and international standardization

David Pistoni
Co-founder and CEO
Zeleros Hyperloop
SPAIN
Zeleros is a European company leading the development of hyperloop. Zeleros’s main approach minimizes infrastructure costs by adding the main technologies in the vehicle, resulting in a unique solution that provides the needed scalability to connect long distances efficiently, cutting emissions from aviation and trucking as well as offering safe pressures for passengers. After the validation of subsystems at laboratory scale, the company is creating a 2km test track in Spain to demonstrate the system at high speed. Zeleros is promoting international standardization supported by major technological companies, investors and research institutes, with the goal of achieving global interoperability.

Forecasting traffic is the first step to reduce congestion

Thomas Epp
Managing director
PTV Group
AUSTRIA
Urban population growth increases the demand on transport networks in cities, leading to higher levels of congestion and delays. Advances in ITS technology allow transport authorities to make use of new methods to reduce travel time and traffic congestion, promoting integrated and seamless travel along main corridors. By using traffic forecasts, transport managers have more leverage for maneuvers to implement the best measures. Model-based solutions, which can output dynamic forecasts for a time horizon of up to 60 minutes, combine proven offline traffic modeling with real-time data and algorithms to provide traffic planners with the information they need to make the right decisions.

Break

The hyperloop – revolutionizing transportation at the speed of sound – challenges and progress

Tim Houter
Co-founder and CEO
Hardt Hyperloop
NETHERLANDS
A thrilling story about the potential of the hyperloop and how it will change the world. What would a hyperloop-connected world look like and what would that mean for society as a whole? We need to find a sustainable alternative for the aviation industry (just this industry alone will emit more CO2 than allowed by the entire world in the Paris Climate Agreement). This alternative is the hyperloop. What's the current status of the hyperloop development, what are the challenges along the way, and when will it be a reality that passengers and cargo can travel in the hyperloop?

Congestion as a tool to avoid congestion: breaking away from the traditional transport paradigm

Prof Hermann Knoflacher
Professor
University of Technology Vienna
AUSTRIA
Dr Harald Frey
Project leader
University of Technology Vienna
AUSTRIA
The traditional transport paradigm, based on 'growth of mobility', 'travel time saving' and 'freedom of modal choice' sees congestion as a problem that should be prevented. This narrow view was overcome with the knowledge of real system behavior: constants of trips, travel time and the structural determination of human behavior. Quality of Service level F became part of the engineering multimodal toolbox to manage and control the transport and urban system in a sustainable direction. These principles, developed in the 1970s, have been implemented with success and contributed to Vienna's top position in the Quality of Life ranking.

User charging: the key to sustainable roads?

Marissa Burkett
Senior business analyst, RUC
Ptolemus
FRANCE
Get to grips with the implementation of road user charging worldwide as a method for funding roads and managing congestion. Map out the global road user charging landscape, including the ever-evolving technologies used to charge for and enforce tolling. Understand best practices for rolling out a successful road user charging scheme, be it congestion zones in cities or motorway tolling. Assess how successful charging for road usage in reducing congestion and pollution in inner cities has been, including case studies of how it has been implemented in cities such as London.

Lunch

The Leading Innovation Timeline – an enabler for traffic management roadmaps

Louis Hendriks
Senior advisor international traffic management and ITS
Rijkswaterstaat - National Traffic Centre
NETHERLANDS
To make the right choices concerning smart mobility, road operators must monitor ITS developments relevant for traffic management. To deal with this, Dutch road authority Rijkswaterstaat has developed the Leading Innovation Timeline (LIT) together with the EU ITS Platform. It visualizes future innovations, particularly changes in IT systems that are expected to have an impact on traffic management. The LIT helps create awareness of what is happening around us and how fast it will influence traffic management. When relying on the LIT, investments can be made in a timely manner and the risks of innovations can be better assessed.

How to make carsharing work in low population density zones

Dr Michel Parent
President
AutoKAB
FRANCE
Carsharing has proved to be quite successful in dense cities. However, there is a greater need for it in low-density zones as a complement to mass transit. However, in order to be financially sustainable, the empty vehicles need to be moved according to need. While we wait for fully autonomous vehicles, we can start with manual operation combined with low-speed driverless techniques such as platooning and remote operation.

Intelligent trains and autonomous cars: friends or foes?

Pierre Gosset
Chief technical officer
Systra
FRANCE
For more than 200 years, trains have offered the public unparalleled service in terms of capacity, speed, safety and, nowadays, low carbon emission. The industry is now about to release a new generation of intelligent autonomous trains, benefiting from innovative technologies, with the aim of substantially increasing reliability and flexibility. The presentation will also tackle two questions. First, how will new trains compete with and complete mobility solutions offered by autonomous cars? Then, why will autonomous cars' use of the principles of connected infrastructure, a technology developed 50 years ago by the railway industry, not spell the end of trains?

Break

More knowledge, information and intelligence, but the traffic problem remains. How can digitization reduce traffic congestion?

Gunnar Froh
CEO
Wunder Mobility
GERMANY
The new emerges where old orders are questioned. But most people don't dare to do that unless there's an excuse – and this is what new technologies are always great for, especially digitization. In particular, networks and mobile systems – from notebooks to smartphones to the Internet of Things – are dissolving the old industrial ways. Technology has been helping to do this step by step. But will this reduce traffic? Gunnar points out what needs to be done, and that digitization can keep its promise to reduce traffic congestion.

Mastering Last Mile

Marcus Willand
Head of Mobility
MHP
GERMANY
Steadily increasing delivery on the last mile opposes big challenges on cities as it is responsible for congesting on the streets and to some extent economically not efficient. At the same time new players for vehicles, logistic concepts and digital infrastructure appear on the scene to be part of the solution and the – for sure – of the business. The presentation will shed some light on the fundamental challenges the involved industries are facing and shows first innovative approaches to stay ahead of the game.

Preventing overcrowding – pedestrian simulation in virtual environments

Silvia Bernkopf
Business development
AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH
AUSTRIA
As the number of public transport users increases, the risk of overcrowding is becoming a major challenge that needs to be addressed. Big crowds must be managed in infrastructures with limited space within a very short time. The application of pedestrian simulations in virtual environments provides analysis and optimization of pedestrian flows and thus minimizes risks and increases efficiency. The session will highlight the possibilities of pedestrian simulation tools from small-scale measures to considerable actions. Successful projects with applications in public transport, major events, city districts and tourist hot spots will demonstrate the benefits and positive impact of pedestrian simulation tools.

New urban mobility now – a pioneering mobility solution

Lars Hesselgren
Director of research
PLP Architecture
UK
PLPLabs and RISE Research Institutes of Sweden have launched a research report unveiling a new transport concept called NuMo – New Urban Mobility. It is a pioneering mobility solution that combines automated electric vehicles (AEVs) with mass transit, and utilizes dedicated street networks and control systems that integrate with existing infrastructure for a smooth transition to a fully automated transport system. Despite investment in road infrastructure, the current traffic systems in cities face significant challenges. NuMo has been developed as a direct response to the current pressures of urban mobility, including congestion, poor air quality, decreasing travel speeds, road accidents and mixed modes.

The future of urban parking in the age of digitization

Dr Mark Friesen
Managing partner
Quinta Consulting
GERMANY
Parking is an important infrastructure location for ground-based transportation. However, the urban parking business has come under pressure in recent years, not only because digital and technological innovations have arisen, but also because market requirements for things like EVs, AVs and TNCs are changing dramatically. This presentation will address the main forces of both, illustrating what urban parking looks like today and explaining how disruptive trends like digitization, data and new modes of surface transportation will shape the future of urban parking.

Break

UAE transportation challenges and opportunities

Laila Hareb
Advisor to DG
General Civil Aviation Authority
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
The UAE is a leading country in the implementation of new technologies in the field of transportation. The recent announcements of the hyperloop implementation and Dubai UAV AirTaxi have created some challenges for the government to reshape its governance framework to foster these technologies. The presentation will shed some light on these challenges and future opportunities in the UAE transportation system.

Mobility in the city of tomorrow

Nora Szabo
Traffic manager
PTV Group
AUSTRIA
The concept of new mobility stems from the new way of looking at the basic human need to move from place to place, intrinsically linked with an unprecedented level of information provided to people in the age of the current digital revolution. New mobility consists of three analytical pillars: real-time traffic modeling including air quality and congestion management segments, MaaS and algorithms for shared and autonomous driving. Only through advanced modeling, simulation and real-time operational solutions is it possible to evaluate the impact (social, financial and technological) of the change we are facing. The session will present global experiences and modeling case studies, which provide an insight into how we can be ready to adopt the global change for mobility in the city of tomorrow.

Next-generation logistics – improving transport mobility with modular cargo trains and AVs

Prof Tjark Siefkes
Department manager - vehicle concepts
German Aerospace Center (DLR)
GERMANY
The presentation will discuss improved transport mobility with less traffic through integrated, seamless door-to-door logistics, achieved via new high-speed modular cargo trains and modular autonomous road vehicles. Both transport modes are connected via a new type of logistics terminal, which loads and unloads a complete train within three minutes. A central feature of the road vehicle is a standardized autonomous electric drive board with integrated lifting device for holding various cargo containers. Central features of the double-deck train are individually driven cars (400km/h) with automatic loading. The intermodal terminal minimizes the throughput time of the various goods.

Hyperloop: Coming Soon to a Station Near You?

Becrom Basu
Director
L.E.K. Consulting
UK
Hyperloop technology has the potential to revolutionize travel. It promises massively reduced journey times, lower capital costs and better energy efficiency. It is also expected to bring significant agglomeration benefits – claims that, coupled with the ability to 'virtualize' existing transport hubs, have caught the imagination of the market. Considerable work is underway to make hyperloop technology a reality, but what role will it play in future transport provision? L.E.K. Consulting examines the challenges aspiring hyperloop operators and investors must deal with before the technology can become a reality: overcoming technology barriers; pricing, public subsidy and commercial feasibility; and timing of rollout.

Lunch

How does London’s transport authority embrace disruptive innovation

Dr Polyvios Polyviou
Transport innovation policy manager
TfL - Transport for London
UK
New mobility services, if well managed, could play an important role in urban mobility. London’s ambitious target for 80 per cent of journeys to be made by public transport, cycling or walking by 2041 makes it ever more necessary to embrace innovative solutions that offer answers to key transport challenges. This presentation will provide some practical examples of how policy-making, trials and new ways of procuring can support disruptive innovation.

Urban congestion – will it increase, or decrease, with the coming of autonomous vehicles?

Dr Elham Asadi
Research Scientist - Autonomous Vehicles and Smart Mobility
Horiba MIRA
UK
Recent progress in automotive industry will make connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs) a real transport option in the close future. Although there are several legal, technical and social issues that must be addressed before having autonomous vehicles in the road, these cars should be considered in terms of transport planning into the future as they are likely to have significant impacts on travel behaviour and road network operations. It is often argued that the coming of autonomous vehicles will increase urban congestion because of the increased number of vehicle movements associated with ‘empty-leg’ journeys (i.e. empty vehicles moving from a passenger drop-off point to a parking space, or subsequent passenger pick-up point). The counter-argument is that autonomous vehicles will ease congestion problems because of the better road discipline and tighter control margins which will be associated with these vehicles. However since CAVs have not been widespread yet, naturalistic data collection is not an option for impact analysis of these vehicles on the traffic network. My talk will address these issues using a quantitative, agent-based, traffic simulation model and exercising it to assess a range of different future scenarios. The talk is structured as follows: - Introducing the potential impact of connected and autonomous vehicles on transportation - Brief summary of the procedure of building and calibrating the city-scale model - Describing the methodology used to simulate the driving behaviour of the connected and autonomous vehicles - Presenting the results of the simulation including the effect on traffic flow and travel time

From shared mobility to micromobility – the enabling devices and technology

Nixon Xavier
Vice president, innovation
Katalyst Technologies
USA
Crowdsourcing services like Uber make it possible to find transportation through private rides, bikes or scooters within minutes. This session will cover the future and adoption of micromobility, and how it will replace the larger shared mobility market. Attendees will learn more about the devices and technology that will enable organizations to innovate in compliance with regulations for the safety of drivers, passengers and pedestrians.

Stream 7: Quantum Effects Through Big & Small Changes

The role of the Innovation and Networks Executive Agency in supporting research and innovation

Alan Haigh
Head of department, research and innovation
European Commission
BELGIUM
The European Commission supports transport research innovation and deployment through the implementation of many funding programs. The Horizon 2020 Research and Innovation program and the Connecting Europe Facility (CEF) are two such programs implemented by the Innovation and Networks Executive Agency (INEA). The total value of the EC grants administered at INEA is currently approaching €33bn. This presentation will highlight elements of each program and examples of the topic areas from aviation to urban mobility. Future funding opportunities will also be highlighted.

Where are we now? Hyperloop development and international standardization

David Pistoni
Co-founder and CEO
Zeleros Hyperloop
SPAIN
Zeleros is a European company leading the development of hyperloop. Zeleros’s main approach minimizes infrastructure costs by adding the main technologies in the vehicle, resulting in a unique solution that provides the needed scalability to connect long distances efficiently, cutting emissions from aviation and trucking as well as offering safe pressures for passengers. After the validation of subsystems at laboratory scale, the company is creating a 2km test track in Spain to demonstrate the system at high speed. Zeleros is promoting international standardization supported by major technological companies, investors and research institutes, with the goal of achieving global interoperability.

Forecasting traffic is the first step to reduce congestion

Thomas Epp
Managing director
PTV Group
AUSTRIA
Urban population growth increases the demand on transport networks in cities, leading to higher levels of congestion and delays. Advances in ITS technology allow transport authorities to make use of new methods to reduce travel time and traffic congestion, promoting integrated and seamless travel along main corridors. By using traffic forecasts, transport managers have more leverage for maneuvers to implement the best measures. Model-based solutions, which can output dynamic forecasts for a time horizon of up to 60 minutes, combine proven offline traffic modeling with real-time data and algorithms to provide traffic planners with the information they need to make the right decisions.

Break

The hyperloop – revolutionizing transportation at the speed of sound – challenges and progress

Tim Houter
Co-founder and CEO
Hardt Hyperloop
NETHERLANDS
A thrilling story about the potential of the hyperloop and how it will change the world. What would a hyperloop-connected world look like and what would that mean for society as a whole? We need to find a sustainable alternative for the aviation industry (just this industry alone will emit more CO2 than allowed by the entire world in the Paris Climate Agreement). This alternative is the hyperloop. What's the current status of the hyperloop development, what are the challenges along the way, and when will it be a reality that passengers and cargo can travel in the hyperloop?

Congestion as a tool to avoid congestion: breaking away from the traditional transport paradigm

Prof Hermann Knoflacher
Professor
University of Technology Vienna
AUSTRIA
Dr Harald Frey
Project leader
University of Technology Vienna
AUSTRIA
The traditional transport paradigm, based on 'growth of mobility', 'travel time saving' and 'freedom of modal choice' sees congestion as a problem that should be prevented. This narrow view was overcome with the knowledge of real system behavior: constants of trips, travel time and the structural determination of human behavior. Quality of Service level F became part of the engineering multimodal toolbox to manage and control the transport and urban system in a sustainable direction. These principles, developed in the 1970s, have been implemented with success and contributed to Vienna's top position in the Quality of Life ranking.

User charging: the key to sustainable roads?

Marissa Burkett
Senior business analyst, RUC
Ptolemus
FRANCE
Get to grips with the implementation of road user charging worldwide as a method for funding roads and managing congestion. Map out the global road user charging landscape, including the ever-evolving technologies used to charge for and enforce tolling. Understand best practices for rolling out a successful road user charging scheme, be it congestion zones in cities or motorway tolling. Assess how successful charging for road usage in reducing congestion and pollution in inner cities has been, including case studies of how it has been implemented in cities such as London.

Lunch

The Leading Innovation Timeline – an enabler for traffic management roadmaps

Louis Hendriks
Senior advisor international traffic management and ITS
Rijkswaterstaat - National Traffic Centre
NETHERLANDS
To make the right choices concerning smart mobility, road operators must monitor ITS developments relevant for traffic management. To deal with this, Dutch road authority Rijkswaterstaat has developed the Leading Innovation Timeline (LIT) together with the EU ITS Platform. It visualizes future innovations, particularly changes in IT systems that are expected to have an impact on traffic management. The LIT helps create awareness of what is happening around us and how fast it will influence traffic management. When relying on the LIT, investments can be made in a timely manner and the risks of innovations can be better assessed.

How to make carsharing work in low population density zones

Dr Michel Parent
President
AutoKAB
FRANCE
Carsharing has proved to be quite successful in dense cities. However, there is a greater need for it in low-density zones as a complement to mass transit. However, in order to be financially sustainable, the empty vehicles need to be moved according to need. While we wait for fully autonomous vehicles, we can start with manual operation combined with low-speed driverless techniques such as platooning and remote operation.

Intelligent trains and autonomous cars: friends or foes?

Pierre Gosset
Chief technical officer
Systra
FRANCE
For more than 200 years, trains have offered the public unparalleled service in terms of capacity, speed, safety and, nowadays, low carbon emission. The industry is now about to release a new generation of intelligent autonomous trains, benefiting from innovative technologies, with the aim of substantially increasing reliability and flexibility. The presentation will also tackle two questions. First, how will new trains compete with and complete mobility solutions offered by autonomous cars? Then, why will autonomous cars' use of the principles of connected infrastructure, a technology developed 50 years ago by the railway industry, not spell the end of trains?

Break

More knowledge, information and intelligence, but the traffic problem remains. How can digitization reduce traffic congestion?

Gunnar Froh
CEO
Wunder Mobility
GERMANY
The new emerges where old orders are questioned. But most people don't dare to do that unless there's an excuse – and this is what new technologies are always great for, especially digitization. In particular, networks and mobile systems – from notebooks to smartphones to the Internet of Things – are dissolving the old industrial ways. Technology has been helping to do this step by step. But will this reduce traffic? Gunnar points out what needs to be done, and that digitization can keep its promise to reduce traffic congestion.

Mastering Last Mile

Marcus Willand
Head of Mobility
MHP
GERMANY
Steadily increasing delivery on the last mile opposes big challenges on cities as it is responsible for congesting on the streets and to some extent economically not efficient. At the same time new players for vehicles, logistic concepts and digital infrastructure appear on the scene to be part of the solution and the – for sure – of the business. The presentation will shed some light on the fundamental challenges the involved industries are facing and shows first innovative approaches to stay ahead of the game.

Preventing overcrowding – pedestrian simulation in virtual environments

Silvia Bernkopf
Business development
AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH
AUSTRIA
As the number of public transport users increases, the risk of overcrowding is becoming a major challenge that needs to be addressed. Big crowds must be managed in infrastructures with limited space within a very short time. The application of pedestrian simulations in virtual environments provides analysis and optimization of pedestrian flows and thus minimizes risks and increases efficiency. The session will highlight the possibilities of pedestrian simulation tools from small-scale measures to considerable actions. Successful projects with applications in public transport, major events, city districts and tourist hot spots will demonstrate the benefits and positive impact of pedestrian simulation tools.

New urban mobility now – a pioneering mobility solution

Lars Hesselgren
Director of research
PLP Architecture
UK
PLPLabs and RISE Research Institutes of Sweden have launched a research report unveiling a new transport concept called NuMo – New Urban Mobility. It is a pioneering mobility solution that combines automated electric vehicles (AEVs) with mass transit, and utilizes dedicated street networks and control systems that integrate with existing infrastructure for a smooth transition to a fully automated transport system. Despite investment in road infrastructure, the current traffic systems in cities face significant challenges. NuMo has been developed as a direct response to the current pressures of urban mobility, including congestion, poor air quality, decreasing travel speeds, road accidents and mixed modes.

The future of urban parking in the age of digitization

Dr Mark Friesen
Managing partner
Quinta Consulting
GERMANY
Parking is an important infrastructure location for ground-based transportation. However, the urban parking business has come under pressure in recent years, not only because digital and technological innovations have arisen, but also because market requirements for things like EVs, AVs and TNCs are changing dramatically. This presentation will address the main forces of both, illustrating what urban parking looks like today and explaining how disruptive trends like digitization, data and new modes of surface transportation will shape the future of urban parking.

Break

UAE transportation challenges and opportunities

Laila Hareb
Advisor to DG
General Civil Aviation Authority
UNITED ARAB EMIRATES
The UAE is a leading country in the implementation of new technologies in the field of transportation. The recent announcements of the hyperloop implementation and Dubai UAV AirTaxi have created some challenges for the government to reshape its governance framework to foster these technologies. The presentation will shed some light on these challenges and future opportunities in the UAE transportation system.

Mobility in the city of tomorrow

Nora Szabo
Traffic manager
PTV Group
AUSTRIA
The concept of new mobility stems from the new way of looking at the basic human need to move from place to place, intrinsically linked with an unprecedented level of information provided to people in the age of the current digital revolution. New mobility consists of three analytical pillars: real-time traffic modeling including air quality and congestion management segments, MaaS and algorithms for shared and autonomous driving. Only through advanced modeling, simulation and real-time operational solutions is it possible to evaluate the impact (social, financial and technological) of the change we are facing. The session will present global experiences and modeling case studies, which provide an insight into how we can be ready to adopt the global change for mobility in the city of tomorrow.

Next-generation logistics – improving transport mobility with modular cargo trains and AVs

Prof Tjark Siefkes
Department manager - vehicle concepts
German Aerospace Center (DLR)
GERMANY
The presentation will discuss improved transport mobility with less traffic through integrated, seamless door-to-door logistics, achieved via new high-speed modular cargo trains and modular autonomous road vehicles. Both transport modes are connected via a new type of logistics terminal, which loads and unloads a complete train within three minutes. A central feature of the road vehicle is a standardized autonomous electric drive board with integrated lifting device for holding various cargo containers. Central features of the double-deck train are individually driven cars (400km/h) with automatic loading. The intermodal terminal minimizes the throughput time of the various goods.

Hyperloop: Coming Soon to a Station Near You?

Becrom Basu
Director
L.E.K. Consulting
UK
Hyperloop technology has the potential to revolutionize travel. It promises massively reduced journey times, lower capital costs and better energy efficiency. It is also expected to bring significant agglomeration benefits – claims that, coupled with the ability to 'virtualize' existing transport hubs, have caught the imagination of the market. Considerable work is underway to make hyperloop technology a reality, but what role will it play in future transport provision? L.E.K. Consulting examines the challenges aspiring hyperloop operators and investors must deal with before the technology can become a reality: overcoming technology barriers; pricing, public subsidy and commercial feasibility; and timing of rollout.

Lunch

How does London’s transport authority embrace disruptive innovation

Dr Polyvios Polyviou
Transport innovation policy manager
TfL - Transport for London
UK
New mobility services, if well managed, could play an important role in urban mobility. London’s ambitious target for 80 per cent of journeys to be made by public transport, cycling or walking by 2041 makes it ever more necessary to embrace innovative solutions that offer answers to key transport challenges. This presentation will provide some practical examples of how policy-making, trials and new ways of procuring can support disruptive innovation.

Urban congestion – will it increase, or decrease, with the coming of autonomous vehicles?

Dr Elham Asadi
Research Scientist - Autonomous Vehicles and Smart Mobility
Horiba MIRA
UK
Recent progress in automotive industry will make connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs) a real transport option in the close future. Although there are several legal, technical and social issues that must be addressed before having autonomous vehicles in the road, these cars should be considered in terms of transport planning into the future as they are likely to have significant impacts on travel behaviour and road network operations. It is often argued that the coming of autonomous vehicles will increase urban congestion because of the increased number of vehicle movements associated with ‘empty-leg’ journeys (i.e. empty vehicles moving from a passenger drop-off point to a parking space, or subsequent passenger pick-up point). The counter-argument is that autonomous vehicles will ease congestion problems because of the better road discipline and tighter control margins which will be associated with these vehicles. However since CAVs have not been widespread yet, naturalistic data collection is not an option for impact analysis of these vehicles on the traffic network. My talk will address these issues using a quantitative, agent-based, traffic simulation model and exercising it to assess a range of different future scenarios. The talk is structured as follows: - Introducing the potential impact of connected and autonomous vehicles on transportation - Brief summary of the procedure of building and calibrating the city-scale model - Describing the methodology used to simulate the driving behaviour of the connected and autonomous vehicles - Presenting the results of the simulation including the effect on traffic flow and travel time

From shared mobility to micromobility – the enabling devices and technology

Nixon Xavier
Vice president, innovation
Katalyst Technologies
USA
Crowdsourcing services like Uber make it possible to find transportation through private rides, bikes or scooters within minutes. This session will cover the future and adoption of micromobility, and how it will replace the larger shared mobility market. Attendees will learn more about the devices and technology that will enable organizations to innovate in compliance with regulations for the safety of drivers, passengers and pedestrians.

Stream 8: Road Freight – Pathway to Efficiency

The concepts enabling an integrated, autonomous urban transport system

Rodrigo Caetano
Business development manager
Scania CV AB
SWEDEN
Autonomous vehicles represent an exceptional opportunity to change urban mobility as long as they are integrated into a shared and seamless public transport network. This proposal takes a closer look at concepts that cater to the trunk lines and the first and last mile to enable an autonomous, seamless, shared transport system. The aim is to offer a scalable multimodal solution built on a common platform that is practical, offers seamless transition between different modes, and is inclusive.

Transforming transportation – the challenges in the commercial vehicle industry

Thomas Doering
Senior manager business development
Traton SE
GERMANY
Challenges in the commercial vehicle industry will lead to new thoughts on how to transport goods in the future. Drivers including alternative drivetrains and autonomous driving will require OEMs to significantly transform transportation and to further develop transport solutions for the customers of the future. This presentation will provide an OEM's view on how to tackle the challenges of the industry over the next 10 years.

Ignition of the heavy-duty electric vehicle transition

Arne Eindhoven
Head of e-mobility innovation
E.ON SE
GERMANY
The presentation will cover the big picture; trends seen in the market and expected timelines; the competition between hydrogen and electrification in the heavy-duty transition; whether to reinvent the wheel or join collaborative platforms; how to choose ion TCO, timelines, investment and risk.

Break

Autonomous driving and platooning – pilot applications and experiences from a real-world application

Chung Anh Tran
Head of autonomous driving – road transport
Deutsche Bahn AG
GERMANY
Autonomous driving will change transport processes and generate new business models in logistics. Deutsche Bahn is striving to integrate this innovation into its processes and drive the transformation process forward. Strategically, the company would therefore like to position itself in the best way possible for the future, with partnerships and pilot projects as in the case of EDDI. Our findings show that operating electronically linked trucks on German motorways is safe, technically reliable and easily applicable in the routine of a logistics company. These are the key results of the world's first field test with truck platoons in real logistics operations.

Anticipating the potential rebounds of mobility and logistics innovations

Ming Chen
Senior consultant
TNO
NETHERLANDS
Vehicle automation is targeting a reduction in congestion and improved road safety. Do we pay sufficient attention to potential unintended negative effects? The costs for long-distance road freight transportation could be reduced by 50% when automation is possible on highways (SAE Level 4) some time around 2022. On-demand mobility is particularly interesting where parking fees are highest. What will this all imply for our societal targets? How can we anticipate these rebounds and which new policy tools can we use instead to get a grip on mobility?

Whose truck is it anyway? And will it really matter in an age of AI-driven freight exchange platforms?

Lyall Cresswell
CEO and founder
Transport Exchange Group
UK
It’s the question that every commercial fleet manager is asking. What’s the future of freight transportation? This presentation will reveal why ‘edgeless fleets’ underpinned by AI-driven freight exchange platforms will help fleets flourish in the logistics landscapes of tomorrow. It will demonstrate how freight exchange platforms – and the fleets signed up to them – will square the circle by creating a trust network across the entire supply chain, allowing individual fleets to see the bigger picture – and thrive.

Lunch

Rise of the road pilots

James Tillyer
Consultant
Transformotion
UK
Eleven million truck and bus drivers in Europe face an uncertain future because of vehicle autonomy. This presentation will introduce Steer to Career, an EU-funded project that seeks to encourage the development of professional drivers to reduce the future impact of mass redundancy and to get companies thinking about how they can use their drivers' experience and skills to go from being 'just a driver' to becoming a road pilot. The speaker will offer scenarios and predictions based on research, and discuss the technical and social skills needed for the future.

Heavy-duty freight PHEVs: challenges and opportunities through energy and emission management

Dr Steven Wilkins
Senior research scientist
TNO
NETHERLANDS
The transition away from fossil fuels means multiple technologies need to be assessed, while still preserving the functionalities that end users have become accustomed to. One vehicle segment in particular is that of heavy-duty freight. Often these vehicles are required to operate in emission-sensitive (geofenced) areas while still preserving the need to operate over longer distances. This work presents innovations on the assessment and optimization of plug-in hybrids for these applications.

Stream 9: Alternative Thinking – Exploring Alternative Ideas

Future-proofing investment decisions at the Department for Transport

Amanda Rowlatt
Chief analyst
UK Department for Transport
UK
This session will provide an overview of the analysis carried out by the UK Department for Transport to future-proof investment decisions, and the plans to develop this analysis. This will cover our appraisal methodologies, including assessing the wider economic and social impact of projects; the research we have done to assess the evolving uptake and longer term impact of new technologies; and our methodologies to incorporate uncertainty in investment decisions.

Thinking disruptively: intermodal innovation for supermodal mobility

Daniel Huber
Managing partner, strategic design
Moodley Industrial Design GmbH
AUSTRIA
In 2030, 70% of the world's population will live in urban areas. This means that more than 40 megacities will emerge, and a disruptive way of thinking about mobility will be inevitable. For more than 20 years, Daniel and his team have been working with Siemens to make the mobility of the future even more attractive, efficient and user-friendly. Their latest project – 'oneforall' – dissolves the boundaries of known ideas. It is a step into a future in which intermodality is thought through to its ultimate form. We call it supermodal mobility.

Surface access challenges for airports

Johnny Ojeil
Director
Arup
UK
The paper will cover the various accessibility and multi-modal transport requirements to enable an airport to function. This includes policy, legislation and technology advancements and the challenges and opportunities they may bring. Arup has recently been successful in designing a people-mover-type system linking Luton Airport with the railway station. We will explain how this contributes toward a more sustainable form of transport as part of the challenge to increase modal share by non-car users. The presentation will also explore the impact of potential autonomous vehicle take-up on car parking.

Break

Breakthrough technologies like wireless charging, high rate batteries and 5G shaping new mobility solutions and future cities

Dr Grzegorz Ombach
Independent Consultant, former; Vice President Engineering & General Manager Halo China
Former; Qualcomm
GERMANY
During the next 30 years about 70% of a population will live in megacities. This requires completely new approaches for urban mobility and urban planning. Already today we can see many positive developments like electric cars, e-scooters, e-busses, electric autonomous pods, e-planes, super fast charging, stereoscopic garages and many others. New technologies like wireless charging, batteries with 10C rate for charging and discharging and new 5G technology for reliable and faster data communication will help to improve current and create new mobility solutions. This presentation will discuss some examples which are currently under development or in test and will give outlook on future urban mobility as a part of a new city concepts.

Future mobility, focusing on the customer to deliver better outcomes

Giles Perkins
Head of future mobility
WSP
UK
The presentation will discuss the opportunity that future mobility provides to improve the customer experience, removing friction for passenger and freight trips while delivering wider environmental and social benefits. Through practical examples, it will explain how future mobility is being shaped by trends external to transportation, and how industry can learn by adopting a more agile approach to asset and service delivery.

How to implement autonomous vehicles integrated with public transportation

Olav Madland
CEO
Applied Autonomy
NORWAY
The UN sustainable development goals are our key performance indicators when implementing autonomous vehicles. Goal 17 motivates us to share our experience and useful lessons from Kongsberg. We have been operating a fleet of vehicles in mixed traffic during the winter. Much snow and low temperatures have been challenging. The vehicles are integrated into public transport as a regular service. This spring we will begin an on-demand service and start driving without an operator. Our transport service supports two studies, and we will share results from them. We will also share our experience with remote control center services and 5G for V2X.

Lunch

New mobility adoption through human-centered design

Adam Loewy
Design lead
Tangerine
UK
This presentation will illustrate how a human-centric approach to design will influence the future of transportation, and ultimately shape the way we live. With increasing urbanization, multi-modal transport networks are becoming an ever more important aspect of everyday life. The presentation will investigate how these changes will result in a new rationale and how human behavior will influence the emerging transport landscape. By grasping key cultural, social and behavioral developments in human experience, the speaker will share insights from a designer’s perspective into how the challenges presented by Mobility as a Service (MaaS) offer opportunities to introduce positive change.

Anticipating the future disruptive technologies through Innovation Outlook

Sri Ganesan
Mobility consultant, disruptive innovations in mobility
TNO
NETHERLANDS
The increasingly abundant arrival of new technologies, their cross-disciplinary application in transport and the way that people use these technologies force researchers and decision makers to keep up with these developments and regulate them if necessary. With the availability of data in today's world, combined with advanced computing power and artificial intelligence (AI) approaches, we can enhance the use of information to create a solid foundation for foresight of new disruptive technologies and innovations. The presentation will provide an overview of the foresight framework, the Innovation Outlook tool and the MaaS use case, and will conclude with the results and lessons learned.

Trust as a Service – managing riders’ confidence

Andy Taylor
Strategy director
Cubic Transportation Systems
USA
This speech will argue that ultimately, it’s trust that will cement the role of shared mobility in furthering the MaaS vision, and that our attitudes to sharing rides with strangers in environments with or without a driver will depend largely on the emergence of a new breed of trust models, tools and services. Known collectively as 'Trust as a Service', they will sit at the core of shared transportation services and impose a regime of trustworthiness on an industry where regulation remains an issue. This presentation will help policymakers, technologists and transit agencies tread a delicate line between technological innovation and riders’ confidence.

Break

Public authorities as regulatory service providers in the MaaS ecosystem

Vlad Marica
Solution consultant
Fluidtime Data Services GmbH
AUSTRIA
The presentation will demonstrate how public authorities can open the urban mobility market to new transport operators and facilitate market entry by providing a technical infrastructure. Fluidtime has developed a MaaS platform technology suitable for a Level 4 MaaS ecosystem in which city public authorities can become regulatory service providers. They can focus on their urban goals by gaining access to mobility analysis data while providing standardized and regulated market entry to transport services. The mobility market will benefit from new competitors and customers. The public will be enabled to optimally distribute resources and more efficiently utilize private and public transport.

Using artificial intelligence to innovate mass transit

Amos Haggiag
CEO
Optibus
ISRAEL
Cities spend billions of dollars maintaining, upgrading and operating their transit networks, but this market receives remarkably little attention in conversations about the future of mobility. With more than two-thirds of the global population slated to live in urban areas by 2050, investment in world-class mobility is essential. In this presentation, Amos Haggiag, CEO of Optibus, will walk the audience through how artificial intelligence and cloud-based transit technology are empowering transit agencies to improve operations and stay at the center of mobility. He will also present examples of how forward-thinking transit agencies and operators from around the world are using advanced software.
Please Note: This conference program may be subject to change



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