19 - 20 June 2018
Köln Messe, Cologne, Germany

All Streams are across 2 days

Over the next 10-20 years it is expected that more than 60% of the global population will live in cities. Improving mobility, reducing congestion and cutting pollution present some of the biggest challenges for city administrators. Emerging technology, new urban mobility concepts and smarter infrastructure will help to tackle these challenges, thereby improving daily life for citizens and creating new business opportunities.

New technology such as autonomous and self-driving vehicles, artificial intelligence and connected services will create new forms of personal mobility, ride-sharing platforms, public transport solutions and completely new urban mobility concepts such as urban air transport solutions. How will these new and existing mobility models integrate into cities of the future, and how will city administrators work with mobility providers, technology companies and public transportation operators to integrate their services into the existing infrastructure?

IoT, big data, highly connected vehicles and infrastructure, blockchain technology and EVs are all set to have a huge impact on the movement of people and goods, traffic management, pollution and CO2 levels. They will also enhance innovation and create new business opportunities for existing companies and new start-up app developers in smart cities of the future.

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Conference Programme



Day 1: Tuesday 19 June

Congressaal 1 - Level 4 Mobility in Cities of the Future

Moderator

Francesco Mazzola
CEO
T.net Italia SpA
ITALY

09:25

Key changes in the automotive ecosystem: urbanisation, digitisation, sustainability – what’s in it for me?

Massimo Martinotti
head of project management and business development
Italdesign
ITALY
The automotive world is standing on the edge of three big revolutions: urbanisation: less ownership, more shared economy; digitisation: less self-driving, more machine-piloted objects; sustainability: fewer combustion engines and more locally zero-emission engines. All this around a more human-focused approach, less cookie-cutter mentality. But where do we think this will lead us as an industry for our customers, and what could happen next?

09:50

A new era of smart cities

Jan Tijs Nijssen
Associate partner
McKinsey & Company Inc
NETHERLANDS
Nils Köster
Senior consultant
McKinsey & Company Inc
GERMANY
After a wave of criticism following the initial hype around smart cities in 2008-12, the concept of the smart city is having a comeback right now. In fact, we're finding ourselves at the beginning of a new era of smart cities, an era that will be different in major ways and finally has the chance to realise the potential that technology has to improve cities. As part of a new global study on smart cities for the McKinsey Global Institute, we have measured the impact of smart city applications and found that cumulatively, they can improve key dimensions of citizen quality of life, e.g. health, safety, environmental quality, by a substantial amount with minimum capex required. However, there are substantial differences in the ways in which smart city applications should be prioritised – what works in one city might not work in another.

10:15

Putting the passenger at the heart of transport digitisation

Russell Goodenough
Client managing director - transport sector
Fujitsu
UK
Much of the thinking about smart transport mirrors the way that organisations think about urban infrastructure projects: big, monolithic systems that imply centralised control. But now, reservoirs of data are opening up and entrants are finding ways to unlock new value by bringing disparate datasets together. By being open to the 'hyper-personalisation' of transport, enabled by smartphones, apps and wearable tech, transport organisations can know the passenger better, improve their choices and reimagine the way in which they interact with all of the travelling public. And by managing smarter investment in infrastructure, vehicles and passengers – and data sharing between all of these – we can achieve so much more.

10:40 - 11:20

Break

11:20

Towards seamless integrated mobility in smart cities

Thomas Pottebaum
Director automotive strategy
Deloitte Consulting
GERMANY
The emergence of a new mobility ecosystem could offer faster, cheaper, cleaner, safer, more accessible and customised experiences for consumers travelling within or between cities. However, the benefits of the future of mobility model are far greater than enhanced transportation. City infrastructure and people’s lives will also be revolutionised by greater connectivity and convenience achieved. The session explores the evolution of smart cities, with focus on the road towards autonomous driving solutions.

11:45

Technology push versus human demand – driving and being driven

Prof Jelte Bos
Researcher
TNO
NETHERLANDS
The development of transportation is largely driven by technological and economic challenges. Apart from what people intrinsically want, these developments (automated vehicles, hyperloops) also pose certain challenges to human safety, health and comfort, which issues may be pivotal to successful acceptance by the general public. In that respect it should be reckoned that human and technological evolution do not keep up. We may, for example, have realised a hundredfold increase in pace of self-motion over the past 100 years, that of our hearts has remained the same. Are we still putting the cart before the horse?

12:10

Mobility in the city of tomorrow

Ralf Frisch
Solution director MaaS – Mobility as a Service
PTV Group
GERMANY
The presentation focuses on the impacts that mobility will have on the city of tomorrow based on the ITF 'Lisbon study', and how these will have a profound impact in the same way that the motorcar did in the early 1900s.

12:35 - 13:50

Lunch

Moderator

Derrick Choi
Aviation & transportation practice leader
Gensler
USA

13:50

Planning for the future of mobility – policy guidelines for local governments concerning innovative mobility services and connected and automated vehicles

Adela Spulber
Transportation systems analyst
Center for Automotive Research
USA
The rise of innovative mobility services (IMS), such as ride hailing, bike sharing and carsharing, and the deployment of connected and automated vehicles (CAV) will transform how people move, and where they work and live. There will be significant changes in travel patterns and land use decisions, but many CAV and IMS impacts on cities and regions remain uncertain. Multiple alternative futures are still possible, and which ones become a reality depends largely on market penetration, user behaviour and public policy. Local governments need to update their planning, policies and regulations to take into consideration the positive and negative implications of CAV and IMS, and leverage the opportunities to improve transportation systems with the help of these technologies and services.

14:15

Terminal autonomy: future-proofing airports for turbulent technological, regulatory and market skies

Derrick Choi
Aviation & transportation practice leader
Gensler
USA
Airports have long been at the forefront of industrial-orientated autonomy, with simple closed-loop robotic applications for everything from parking shuttle services to airport people movers and baggage handling systems. But as the future of autonomous transport and mobility solutions pushes further ahead – beyond the boundaries of the airport – questions immediately emerge that cast doubt on the airport’s preparedness for the dynamic conditions and indeterminacies of everything from handling human-centric factors and customer service challenges, to the retrofitting of traditional facilities to handle the potential increase in driverless vehicles from the kerb to the tarmac. Through various case studies, the audience will explore how tomorrow’s airport system is learning to leverage the potential of proven closed-loop autonomy in an uncertain market, and the regulatory skies ahead.

14:40

What will future commuters need and how might businesses plan and prepare for the future by anticipating those needs?

Heather McQuaid
Director and co-founder
Future Tonic
UK
We’ve explored how shifts in technology, sociology and economies will transform jobs, workplaces and urban commuting by 2030 and how those changes will affect the needs and attitudes of different types of commuters. To bring these commuters to life, we created six Future Commuter Personas, ranging from the tech-savvy solopreneur to the semi-retired septuagenarian. See how Future Commuters can be used to develop and test new solutions for transforming urban mobility.

15:05 - 15:45

Break

15:45

Meeting London's transport challenge

Steve Kearns
Stakeholder manager
Transport for London
UK
Long-term planning: adoption of the Mayor's transport strategy; need to change the way people travel; healthy streets approach; modal target of 80% of trips by sustainable mode by 2041; a good public transport experience; need to accommodate new homes and jobs; new technology has the potential to shape the vision. Short-term action: Mayor's Clean Air Action Plan; emissions surcharge; changes to Congestion Charging scheme; emerging proposals for Ultra Low Emission Zone; role of zero- and low-emission vehicles; public transport, cycling and walking upgrades.

16:10

Smart urban mobility: challenges and chances for public transport

Dr Rainer Schwarzmann
Managing director
TransportTechnologie-Consult Karlsruhe (TTK)
GERMANY
If new technology will create new solutions for urban mobility, we must ask what role 'conventional' public transport will play in a smart and digitised environment. This presentation will make an attempt to identify the challenges on the one hand, and the chances on the other, as it is likely that new technology alone will not solve the fundamental problems such as a lack of space for parking and infrastructure for driving. It will discuss if public transport is still the major way forward and aim to identify possible adaptations in public transport solutions.

16:35 - 17:10

Panel Discussion

What are the biggest mobility challenges facing cities of the future and what impact will new technology have? How can cities work together with mobility providers in working towards a seamless integrated transportation network that will benefit on both a societal and economic level.

Moderator:

Derrick Choi
Aviation & transportation practice leader
Gensler
USA

Panelists:

Prof Jelte Bos
Researcher
TNO
NETHERLANDS
Thomas Schmidt
Executive director
TomTom Telematics
NETHERLANDS
Adela Spulber
Transportation systems analyst
Center for Automotive Research
USA
Thomas Pottebaum
Director automotive strategy
Deloitte Consulting
GERMANY
Please Note: This conference programme may be subject to change