19 - 20 June 2018
Köln Messe, Cologne, Germany

All Streams are across 2 days

In this session we will look at how transportation networks and cities of the future will need to evolve into highly automated, energy-efficient and intelligent superfast transportation networks capable of generating energy and charging vehicles as they travel. As we start to see the demise of the internal combustion engine and increasing adoption of EVs, how will we meet those energy requirements and charging infrastructure? Who will supply that energy and what will happen to traditional fuelling stations?

More than 30 expert speakers from around the world will also discuss how new technology, concepts and changing user behaviours can increase intermodality between transportation operators to increase efficiency and reduce the environmental impact and carbon intensity of transportation. They will also present what else governments can do to encourage mobility sharing or even zero-emission alternatives such as cycling or walking, as well as new ideas and concepts for last-mile solutions.

This two-day stream is dedicated to discussing how advances in technology, population increase and future emission regulations support economic growth, and understanding how business models will change.

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Conference Programme



Day 2: Wednesday 20 June

Conference Room 3/4 - Level 2 Meeting The Energy Requirements of Transportation

Moderator

Amir Nayeri
Deputy director - infrastructure development
Meridiam
FRANCE

09:00

How reshaping energy markets will support future transport infrastructure

Rubina Singh
Senior consultant
Gemserv
UK
The e-mobility market has grown exponentially but the challenges of range anxiety, high cost and underdeveloped infrastructure are yet to be addressed. Creating the right market conditions is therefore paramount. Gemserv believes a regulatory push is needed for infrastructure to accelerate the transition to an e-mobility future and address issues regarding installation, service models, range anxiety and interoperability. Insights from interviews with multiple stakeholders and investor/business concerns on how emerging standards can improve infrastructure deployment will be presented. A review of the adequacy of market design, regulatory and innovation landscape will also be provided.

09:25

Towards zero-emission public transport

David Yorke
New technology, training and projects manager
Tower Transit Operations Ltd
UK
With all major cities tackling two of the most important issues in the world today – climate change and air quantity – public transport must take the lead in confronting the problem. Currently there are only two options for operating zero-emission buses: plug-in electric and hydrogen fuel cell. Using Tower Transit’s extensive experience, this presentation will explore and assess these different technologies, taking into account the technical issues of running zero-emission buses, alongside the practical operational challenges that will arise. The discussion will also feature current and future innovative trends in the international bus industry.

09:50

The future of fuelling in the age of EVs

Boris Felgendreher
Vice president of marketing Europe
ChargePoint
GERMANY
The future of mobility and transportation is electric. A perfect storm of technological advances, policy initiatives, increasing industry support and rising consumer demand is about to accelerate the electrification of transport and will lead to a dramatic increase in the number of EVs on the streets in Europe in the years to come. The fuelling network that is required to support this electrification across all modes of transport is very different from the traditional fuelling networks of the past. There is still a long way to go to make EV charging easy, convenient, secure and reliable across Europe. But a complex ecosystem of partners is starting to come together to build a new fuelling network for the age of EVs.

10:15

Duality of power grid and energy storage on EV infrastructure

Prof Ricardo Martinez-Botas
Partner
Syrma+Associates
UK
As the number of electric vehicles on the road continues to grow, private and publicly accessible charging infrastructures are under pressure to keep up with growing demand. This is particularly challenging as consumer recharging patterns tend to cluster around specific time-windows, hence creating peaks in power demand that risk overwhelming grid power capacity. Alternative strategies to pure growth in power grid infrastructure are required to provide a timely, economically attractive alternative to an inevitable upcoming surge in recharging power demand. The presenter will discuss the significance of upcoming developments in battery technology and their relevance to the power grid.

10:40 - 11:20

Break

11:20

High-power charging and open networks: essential cornerstone of e-mobility breakthrough

Jörg Lohr
Head of Western Europe rollout coordination
Ionity
GERMANY
Electric vehicles are about to enter mass-market production. However, stakeholders around the globe have created competition by establishing proprietary data protocols, business models and exclusive networks, before the industry could achieve a breakthrough. Ionity – a joint venture of four major car manufacturers – was created to overcome the existing barriers of the EV ecosystem by installing and operating its own accessible, barrier-free network of high-power charging, which will be ready to serve high-power, long-distance electric vehicles on their cross-country trips in 25 European countries.

11:45

Transformative research in transport, land use and urban planning

Harald Frey
Project leader
Vienna University of Technology
AUSTRIA
Transformative research (TR) in the fields of transport and urban planning is a key factor for the future of cities and the transport system. TR in transport sciences can contribute to sustainable development by changing the way of knowledge production and showing how science is accountable to society. The engineering disciplines, which change our environment dramatically, need a much more profound education concerning awareness and responsibility for the effects of engineering interventions. TR can be supported by providing long-term resources, enlarging the group of stakeholders who are integrated in research and by balancing academic knowledge and practical experiences.

12:10

Fast-charging electric vehicles without upgrading the electricity grid

Stephen Voller
CEO
ZapGo Ltd
UK
Drivers of gasoline and diesel cars are used to a five- or ten-minute visit to a filling station to fill up. To provide five to ten minutes' charging of an electric vehicle requires 350kW high-rate DC chargers and EVs equipped to charge much more quickly than the current generation of batteries. ZapGo has developed Carbon-Ion, a replacement for lithium, that can be used to both buffer the grid and provide fast charging on the vehicle. It has already developed an autonomous vehicle that can be recharged in 35 seconds. This means 350kW chargers can be installed without billions invested in new electricity infrastructure.

12:35 - 13:50

Lunch

Moderator

Vincent Bourquin
Professor
University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland
SWITZERLAND

13:50

CO2-neutral long-distance transportation: how it can be done

Koen Reybrouck
General manager
Reycon
BELGIUM
High-volume transportation has been mainly powered by fossil fuels since steam boats replaced sailing boats 200 years ago. The emerging electrification of vehicles might lower the overall CO2 emissions, but will not eradicate them. Reycon presents an ambitious and innovative mass-transport system for the future. People and freight could be moved over long distances, powered by the abundant energy contained in high-altitude winds. Design properties, needed infrastructure, energy balances and application details will be discussed, as well as questions still to be answered and the steps ahead.

14:15

Developing a global market for electricity-based synthetic fuels

Kilian Crone
Mobility expert
Deutsche Energie-Agentur GmbH (DENA)
GERMANY
For long-haul heavy-mobility, aviation and maritime applications, the required higher energy density and shorter refuelling periods make battery-powered systems impractical for the foreseeable future. Meanwhile, the technology for producing renewable electricity-based synthetic fuels (e-fuels) on a large scale is ready and tested. A missing link for the global mobility transition is in the development of a global market for these products, and decreasing costs. The presentation outlines a possible path towards this and highlights regulatory, technological, economical and sustainability milestones.

14:40 - 15:20

Break

15:20

Addressing sustainability on the basis of the Swissmetro disruptive approach

Vincent Bourquin
Professor
University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland
SWITZERLAND
The existing transportation systems have shown their limits in fulfilling the requirements of performance and sustainability. The massive growth of transportation has led to significant negative impacts on people, society and the environment. It is clear that disruptive methods need to be established as soon as possible. But which pioneering country or investor will make the first step? On what path should we go? The example of Switzerland and the constant evolution of the Swissmetro project for more than four decades shows the potential for improvement associated with an adequate combination of technologies integrated in an engineering system.

15:45

Battery charging speed – solving an over-constrained problem through modularity

Jean-Baptiste Segard
Founder and CEO
EP Tender
FRANCE
The path to reaching 100% EV sales by 2040 (if not 2030) is still unclear. We need to set two variables: the battery size and the charging power. The equations are, the car is: - profitable, non-subsidided, price competitive = small battery - long-distance capable = large battery and fast, synchronous charging - minimised carbon footprint = small battery and slow residential demand-response charging Seven equations, two variables: no solution. The paradigm to break is the monobloc car. By introducing modularity, we get two solvable problems: EV for 98% usage, shared add-on power bank trailer for 2% usage.

16:10 - 16:40

Panel Discussion

What more can governments do to lure people away from cars to more efficient modes of transportation?

Moderator:

Vincent Bourquin
Professor
University of Applied Sciences Western Switzerland
SWITZERLAND

Panelists:

Rubina Singh
Senior consultant
Gemserv
UK
Kilian Crone
Mobility expert
Deutsche Energie-Agentur GmbH (DENA)
GERMANY
Please Note: This conference programme may be subject to change